CEI Today: Hurricane Sandy & disaster recovery, the Chrysler/Fiat scandal, Obama's hidden regulatory costs, I,Pencil premiere, and more

CEI Today: Hurricane Sandy & disaster recovery, the Chrysler/Fiat scandal, Obama's hidden regulatory costs, I,Pencil premiere, and more

Today in the News
November 02, 2012

GOV'T DISASTER RESPONSE - IAIN MURRAY

Forbes: Hurricane Sandy, And The Invisible Hand Of Disaster Recovery

Once again, a terrible natural disaster strikes, and Americans from the Carolinas to New England are doing their best to sort through the wreckage and get their lives back to normal. Already, some, including The New York Times, have said natural disasters prove the need for big government. In fact, disaster response provides an excellent example of how the invisible hand of the market works to alleviate suffering and bring quick relief to those in need.

 

CHRYSLER BAILOUT - JOHN BERLAU & MARK BEATTY

Daily Caller: The real Fiat scandal

The real outrage arising from the 2009 Chrysler bailout is not that its parent company, Fiat, is planning to build plants in China. It’s that the politicized bankruptcy process limited Chrysler’s growth potential by tying it to an Italian dinosaur in the midst of the European fiscal crisis. The Obama administration literally gave away ownership of one of the Big Three American auto manufacturers to an Italian car maker struggling with labor and productivity issues worse than those that drove Chrysler to near-liquidation.

As a result, much of Chrysler’s profits from its overhauled line are going to prop up Fiat’s failing, money-losing Italian business, rather than to expanding production and jobs in the U.S.

 

OBAMA'S HIDDEN REGULATORY REGIME - WAYNE CREWS

Forbes: President Obama's Hidden Tax

Regulations are often called a hidden tax; but in President Obama’s case, it’s literally true.

Despite the written commitment to transparency and two executive orders since January 2011 instructing federal agencies to review and roll back rules, it’s hard to tell what federal regulatory agencies are doing in the aggregate and relative to one another.