You are here

Blackburn DC Privacy Roundtable

Title

Blackburn DC Privacy Roundtable

Blackburn DC Privacy Roundtable

The roundtable discussion will cover online privacy issues in anticipation of the final reports to be released this fall by the Department of Commerce and the Federal Trade Commission. Invited participants will consider questions and policy issues related to the value of data, where government should or shouldn’t be involved in regulating online privacy, and alternatives to government regulation

Wednesday, September 14, 2011 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Congressional Visitors Center Meeting Room North -- CVC 268
1st Street SE and East Capitol Street NE
Washington, DC 20515
United States

The roundtable discussion will cover online privacy issues in anticipation of the final reports to be released this fall by the Department of Commerce and the Federal Trade Commission. Invited participants will consider questions and policy issues related to the value of data, where government should or shouldn’t be involved in regulating online privacy, and alternatives to government regulation.

Congressman Blackburn, a member of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Telecommunications and vice chair of the Subcommittee on Commerce, Manufacturing, and Trade, pledged to conduct a national series of tech industry roundtables in a speech to the Telecommunications Industry Association earlier this year. Her first roundtable was held in late June at the Interactive Advertising Bureau’s new online advertising community center in New York City. Congressman Blackburn also recently wrote an op-ed titled “The FTC’s Internet Kill Switch” that addresses why any proposed privacy regulation must consider the costs of diminished competition and innovation.

Confirmed participants include the following policy leaders:

  • Howard Beales, George Washington University School of Business
  • Daniel Castro, Information Technology and Innovation Foundation
  • Larry Downes, TechFreedom
  • Harold Furchgott-Roth, Hudson Institute, Center for Economics of the Internet
  • Jim Harper, Cato Institute
  • Tom Lenard, Technology Policy Institute
  • Randolph May, Free State Foundation
  • Ryan Radia, Competitive Enterprise Institute
  • Berin Szoka, TechFreedom