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Animal Biotechnology: From Frankenfish to Enviro-pig

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Animal Biotechnology: From Frankenfish to Enviro-pig

Will Delay and Obfuscation Threaten the Environment, Undermine the Regulatory Process, and Imperil U.S. Technological Leadership?

Animal Biotechnology: From Frankenfish to Enviro-pig

Despite their potential environmental and consumer benefits, products that can be demonized as FrankenFish or EnviroPig are being delayed by regulatory intransigence, public confusion, and political indecision. With no clear path forward, many products are now being sent overseas to countries with more responsive regulatory climates.

Thursday, September 27, 2012 4:00 pm to 5:30 pm
Room 1300, Longworth House Office Building
United States

Seating is limited. To secure a seat, please arrive early.

Thursday, September 27, 2012

Noon - 1:30 P.M.

Room 1300, Longworth House Office Building

Lunch will be provided.

RSVP here.

With global population rising toward 9 billion people, improvements in agricultural productivity must be made in order to promote food security and protect our environment. Animal biotechnology is poised to play a leading role, and American scientists have long been the undisputed leaders in this field. But despite their potential environmental and consumer benefits, products that can be demonized as FrankenFish or EnviroPig are being delayed by regulatory intransigence, public confusion, and political indecision. With no clear path forward, many products are now being sent overseas to countries with more responsive regulatory climates. Will the United States surrender its lead in science and innovation? Will we be forced to give up technologies that can deliver real environmental and economic benefits?

Please join our expert panel to discuss the pros and cons of animal biotechnology. How does it work? What benefits can it provide? And how might these products impact our environment? Panelists will debate the safety of animal biotechnology and how our regulatory process addresses potential risks. And they will offer their perspectives on the main scientific and regulatory barriers to commercialization.

 

SPEAKERS

Prof. Alison Van Eenennaam, University of California, Davis

Recent member of the FDA’s Veterinary Medicine Advisory Committee and

USDA’s Advisory Committee on Biotechnology and 21st Century Agriculture

 

Prof. William Muir, Purdue University

Co-developer of the “Trojan Gene” Theory and co-author of the 2002

National Research Council report, Animal Biotechnology: Science-Based Concerns

 

Mr. Fred Degnan, King & Spalding

Food regulation expert and former FDA Associate Chief Counsel for Foods

 

Prof. James Murray, University of California, Davis

Developer of transgenic goats bioengineered to produce human medicines

 

Mr. Gregory Conko, Competitive Enterprise Institute

Author of The Frankenfood Myth: How Protest and Politics Threaten the Biotech Revolution

 

Click here to RSVP.