Competitive Enterprise Institute Re-Issues Classic On Antitrust: Tom Smith Back for Microsoft Debate

Competitive Enterprise Institute Re-Issues Classic On Antitrust: Tom Smith Back for Microsoft Debate

September 15, 1998

Washington, D.C., September 15, 1998 – The Competitive Enterprise Institute (CEI) is proud to release the first paperback version of the underground classic, Tom Smith and his Incredible Bread Machine. "The story is simple, and eerily familiar to today’s readers," states CEI’s introduction to this 64-page humorous parable about competition policy. "The protagonist, a dweeby looking inventor with glasses, comes up with a product that revolutionizes the lives of people around the world. He grows rich in the process and soon becomes the object of scorn. Antitrust bureaucrats then charge him with harming the ‘public good.’" The rules of antitrust are simple, they state:

"You're gouging on your prices ifYou charge more than the rest.But it's unfair competitionIf you think you can charge less!A second point that we would makeTo help avoid confusion:Don't try to charge the same amount!That would be collusion!"

While the protagonist here is not Bill Gates – who was still in elementary school when this work was first published in 1964 – Tom Smith nevertheless speaks to the antitrust debates of today. Written entirely in verse and illustrated throughout, Tom Smith shows how antitrust regulation can threaten not only the most productive and innovative members of our society, but consumers as well.

"…Tom Smith and his Incredible Bread Machine provides an entertaining and provocative view of the age-old conflict between the productive individual and the compulsory state," states the jacket cover of one of the original versions of R.W. Grant’s story about a man, his invention, and antitrust regulation.

CEI, a non-profit, non-partisan public policy group founded in 1984, is dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government. For more information or to obtain a copy of the book, contact Emily McGee, director of public relations, at 202-331-1010.