Leading Environmentalist Agrees With CEI On Wind Power

Leading Environmentalist Agrees With CEI On Wind Power

Subsidies No Longer Needed, Technology "Commercially Proven"
February 28, 2002

Washington, D.C., March 1, 2002 — In a surprising but welcome move, a leading environmentalist has come to agree with the free market Competitive Enterprise Institute that subsidies for wind-turbine power plants are no longer necessary.<?xml:namespace prefix = o ns = "urn:schemas-microsoft-com:office:office" />

 

In a recent interview with the Radio America network, David Hawkins, Director of the National Resources Defense Council’s Climate Center, said that wind power has now been “commercially proven” and no longer needs to be subsidized, as demonstrated by the decision made by the government of Denmark, a longtime proponent of wind-generated power, to withdraw future price supports for the industry.  Denmark is also home to two of the three leading wind-turbine manufacturers in the world.

 

“We are heartened that groups like NRDC and CEI are now in agreement about the status of alternative energy sources,” said Myron Ebell, director of global warming and international environmental policy at CEI.  “With so many other contentious energy issues at stake, we can finally proceed to ending the subsidies for alternative energy technologies like windmills and move on to more important problems.” 

The U.S. government’s longtime subsidy of 1.7 cents per kilowatt hour to wind-generated power  producers recently expired.  Debate over whether to extend the subsidy is currently being heard on Capitol Hill, where the Senate is considering major energy legislation sponsored by Senator Majority Leader Tom Daschle (D-SD).  “With the new consensus, we hope that Congress will realize that renewing the subsidy is an unnecessary expenditure,” concluded Ebell.

CEI is a non-profit, non-partisan public policy group dedicated to the principles of free enterprise and limited government.  For more information, please contact CEI at pr@cei.org or 202-331-1010.