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Soso Whaley Interviewed in Brazil

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Soso Whaley Interviewed in Brazil

Soso Whaley interview in O Estado de Sao Paulo, August 20, 2004

Soso Whaley followed the same regimen and lost weight

The documentary film maker did the same experiment, except that she ate less and exercised, and the result after one month was a weight loss of 4.5 kilograms and lower cholesterol.

Sao Paulo - Coincidentally, documentary film maker Soso Whaley started a similar experiment on the same day as Chazz [Weaver], April 1. She ate only McDonald's for 30 days, but in smaller quantities than Spurlock and Weaver, around 2,000 calories. She also exercised. After one month, she lost 4.5 kilograms and her cholesterol went down. She plans to release a film-to be titled Debunk the Junk (not a reference to junk food). Whaley talked about her experience between hamburgers and French fries.

Have you seen Super Size Me?

Yes, I watched it twice, to better evaluate Spurlock's diet.

How was it to eat only McDonald's for a month?

In truth, I liked the experience. It was fun to test new food choices that we normally don't experience (she has posted recipes featuring McDonald's products at www.cei.org). The yogurt parfait and the new chicken salads are fairly tasty. I was surprised by the new bacon, egg, and cheese McGriddle.

Did you feel any change in your metabolism?

Absolutely. By reducing my caloric intake and exercising I experienced all sorts of benefits. I found myself with more energy, I appreciated food more, and decided to keep up my physical activity to lose more weight.

Did you find it healthy to eat McDonald's every day?

Of course. The food at McDondald's is no different from what you find anywhere else and they offer a truly incredible variety. For example, what's and Egg McMuffin? An English muffin, a fried egg, and a slice of cheese. Add a glass of orange juice and you would be eating a healthy breakfast no different from what you would eat at home. Also, is enough to just buy this at McDonald's to raise the ire of anti-meat and anti-corporate activists.

Why do you defend McDonald's? Are they paying you for this?

I have not been paid by McDonald's or by any other corporation or organization to make this film. Let me clarify something: This film is not a defense of McDonald's, but of freedom of choice and personal responsibility. If all fast food restaurants disappeared tomorrow, I have no doubt that the "obesity crisis" would continue to exist. And then who would feed policemen, lawyers, and documentary filmmakers?