You are here

OpenMarket: November 2011

  • Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis Continues to Advance Dangerous Big Labor Agenda

    November 29, 2011
    Openmarket.org Yesterday, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis wrote an indignant blog post titled, “Long Overdue: Winning Back Pay and Benefits for Workers,” in which she blasted employers for not making payroll. She exclaims, “Workers deserve to keep the wages and benefits they earn. That may sound like an obvious statement, but to some employers, it’s not clear at all.” Secretary Solis cites $8 million in back pay and benefits that federal investigators recovered for workers. She maligns employers for not fully contributing to pension funds, as well as violating Service Contract Act and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (both laws increase...
  • Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis Continues to Advance Dangerous Big Labor Agenda

    November 29, 2011
    Yesterday, Secretary of Labor Hilda Solis wrote an indignant blog post titled, “Long Overdue: Winning Back Pay and Benefits for Workers,” in which she blasted employers for not making payroll. She exclaims, “Workers deserve to keep the wages and benefits they earn. That may sound like an obvious statement, but to some employers, it’s not clear at all.” Secretary Solis cites $8 million in back pay and benefits that federal investigators recovered for workers. She maligns employers for not fully contributing to pension funds, as well as violating Service Contract Act and Employee Retirement Income Security Act (both laws increase government intervention and eliminate...
  • Let Me Be Clear

    November 29, 2011
    Editor, Politico: Jonathan Allen’s November 28 article, “Mandatory budget cuts after supercommittee failure will trigger pain for some,” is misleading. A cut is when spending goes down. Federal spending will go up every year for at least the next ten years, even with the supercommittee’s failure to reach a bipartisan agreement.
  • Hidden Regulations Stifle Job Creation; EEOC Kills Jobs By Promoting Lawsuits

    November 28, 2011
    When reporters write stories about the cost of regulations, they only focus on regulations found in formal codes of regulations. But most regulations aren't formal regulations, but rather agency interpretations of statutes. Typically, such agency interpretations expand the reach of a  statute the agency helps administer, such as a statute that authorizes lawsuits by job-applicants, employees, tenants, or customers against businesses that allegedly violate the statute's provisions. For example, the EEOC's interpretations of anti-discrimination laws and disabilities-rights laws are not formal rules, as the Supreme Court has noted, but the courts often defer to the EEOC's interpretations anyway. So the EEOC can dramatically...
  • Barney Frank's Cognitive Dissonance on Liberties and Risk-Taking

    November 28, 2011
    Congress will certainly be different and, for the country, better with the absence of Rep. Barney Frank, who announced today he will not seek reelection. Frank's record on civil and constitutional liberties can best be described with a paraphrase of a nursery rhyme. On the rare times he was good, he was very, very good; but when he was bad -- which was most of the time -- he was horrid. Frank is sharp and well-versed on the intricacies of arcane financial legislation and knows how to throw a good rhetorical barb. So on the few issues in which his views coincided with libertarian ones, he was a very good ally to have. I'm very happy he has seen through big retailers' special pleading for price controls on what banks charge them for debit card processing. He fought against inclusion of the...
  • Today's Links: November 28, 2011

    November 28, 2011
    OPINION DALIA LITHWICK: "First Amendment Smackdown: What Would the Founding Fathers Have Thought of Mixed Martial Arts?" "MMA is a combat sport that includes boxing, wrestling, Brazilian jiu-jitsu, karate, judo Greco-Roman wrestling and other styles of fighting. It’s held in an octagonal chain-link cage. There’s blood. (In 1996 John McCain described the sport as 'human cockfighting' but has since recanted.) Events and matches were banned in the state of New York in 1997, before the sport was properly regulated, or even regulated at all. [...] So where does...
  • What the Super Committee Could Have Learned From Italy

    November 28, 2011
    Entitlement reform. Those words alone make politicians' ears bleed. Or in the case of Italy, it makes their fists literally fly at one another. I explain in Fox Forum why the collapse of Italy's government at the hands of unsustainable indebtedness should have been a teaching moment for the now-failed Super Committee.
    Stateside, Social Security and Medicare are the two most expensive and fastest growing entitlement programs. Reforming them faces a level of resistance almost on par with in Italy. Generous retirement and health care benefits are so entrenched in Italian society that two deputies got in a fist fight on the parliament floor over pension reform a few weeks ago. America cannot afford...
  • Regulation of the Day 201: Playground Chatter

    November 28, 2011
    Quebec officials are starting to listen in on what children are talking about on school playgrounds during recess to make sure they are speaking French.
  • Update on FMCSA's Proposed Hours-of-Service Rule

    November 28, 2011
    The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), the agency tasked with writing and enforcing safety regulations for large trucks and buses, is due today to file a court report on the status of its proposed new hours-of-service rule -- which dictates how many hours drivers may work, must spend in their sleeper berths, frequency of breaks, etc. CEI has criticized this rule on multiple occasions, including in formal comments submitted to the FMCSA earlier this year. We've pointed out that the rule, driven by lawsuits from the Teamsters union and the far-left special interest group Public Citizen, is both unnecessary (commercial motor vehicle accident rates have...
  • Are We Living in Post-Republic America?

    November 28, 2011
    Americans have the notion that liberty equals elections, and therefore feel themselves still living in a free country so long as elections proceed as scheduled. But the growth of government bureaucracy threatens to make elections less consequential, and therefore less a guarantor of freedom, as vast decision-making powers are continually ceded to unelected functionaries and czars who minister fiefdoms of appallingly autonomous power. In my column for The Baltimore Sun over Thanksgiving weekend, I explore the growth of the bureaucratic state and what it has meant for our republican institutions. From the column:
    America was born [a republic], or at least that was the Founding Fathers' hope for the government they brought into this world. But as the nation grew, it matured into something quite different. Especially over the past century, Americans collectively and...

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: November 2011