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OpenMarket: September 2019

  • Trump Administration Pushes Back on California's Fuel Economy Scheming

    September 10, 2019
    Since at least March 2018, the Trump administration and the state of California have been engaged in a legal and political struggle over the stringency of motor vehicle fuel economy standards and, more importantly, the legality of California’s power to set and enforce such standards. Last week the Trump administration opened two new fronts in this contest of wills and war of words.
  • Study on Export-Import Bank: Repeal Is Best, Other Reforms Can Help

    September 10, 2019
    The Export-Import Bank is up for reauthorization by September 30. It should be shut down, as I’ve pointed out before, but reauthorization will almost certainly pass. Ex-Im was either shut down or sharply limited for nearly five years, from October 2014 until May of this year.
  • Gene Editing Can Improve Health Outcomes for the Poor

    September 9, 2019
    Gene editing, specifically somatic gene therapy, cures maladies with traceable genetic origins. This revolutionary science is rapidly advancing, but not without major setbacks. Regulations designed to protect patients from dangerous applications of gene editing, both real and imaginary, are increasing the cost, slowing development, and preventing life-saving research.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    September 9, 2019
    Contrary to my earlier prediction, the number of new regulations this year did not pass 2,000 last week, ending the four-day week at 1,991. Meanwhile, Hurricane Dorian spared Alabama despite fears to the contrary. Brexit drama reached a fever pitch in the UK, the Chinese government signaled a willingness to resume trade talks, and state attorneys general launched an antitrust investigation of Facebook. Rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from patent priorities to general service lamps.
  • CNN Hosts Seven-Hour 'Climate Crisis Town Hall' with Democratic Presidential Candidates

    September 6, 2019
    CNN on September 4th broadcast a seven-hour “Climate Crisis Town Hall” featuring ten Democratic presidential candidates. Each of the following candidates was in the spotlight for about 40 minutes: Julián Castro, Andrew Yang, Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), Joe Biden, Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-VT), Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Mayer Pete Buttigieg (D-South Bend, IN), Beto O’Rourke, and Sen. Cory Booker (D-NJ). Transcripts of each candidate’s segment are available here.
  • State Attorneys General Launch Antitrust Investigations, Forget 'Relevant Market' Fallacy

    September 6, 2019
    Facebook and Google are facing separate antitrust investigations from publicity-seeking state attorneys general from both parties. New York’s Democratic attorney general is heading a joint investigation into Facebook for its “dominance in the industry and the potential anticompetitive conduct stemming from that dominance.”
  • Ethanol 'Flex Fuel' No Solution for Climate—or Political Compromise

    September 6, 2019
    Pollster Frank Luntz discussed climate policy Thursday night with Laura Ingraham on her Fox News program “The Ingraham Angle.” In the previous segment, Ingraham interviewed Competitive Enterprise Institute Senior Fellow Patrick Michaels, who debunked the “existential threat” rhetoric permeating CNN’s 7-hour “Climate Crisis Town Hall” on Wednesday. Michaels and Ingraham observed that for progressives, climate change is a pretext for confiscating other people’s assets and running their lives.
  • Welfare for Billionaires: Stadium Subsidies Are Pure Cronyism

    September 6, 2019
    Our old friend (and former Competitive Enterprise Institute journalism fellow) Tim Carney is doing excellent work at the American Enterprise Institute these days, where he is shining a light on the huge costs and breathtaking unfairness of corrupt government handouts to private parties—what we call cronyism.
  • Trump Tariff Costs to Outweigh Benefits from Deregulation

    September 5, 2019
    Early in the Trump administration, a series of executive orders slowed the growth of new regulations and removed some existing rules. From the start of the administration through June 30, 2019, the total savings from these policies are an estimated $46.5 billion, according to a new study by David G. Tuerck and William Burke for the National Foundation for American Policy.
  • Department of Energy Expands Consumer Choice in Light Bulbs

    September 4, 2019
    The Trump administration took a pro-consumer step today as the Department of Energy finalized a rule that will allow certain types of lower-cost light bulbs to remain on the market.   

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