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OpenMarket: March 2020

  • VIDEO: What Did “the Future” Hold for Public Policy in the 1980s?

    March 9, 2020
    The American Enterprise Institute has gone deep into its archives and posted dozens of old videos of roundtables and speeches going back, in some cases, over 40 years. Given the unfair advantage of hindsight, it is fascinating to see which ideas were vindicated and which have been refuted by subsequent events.
  • CEI Comments to FCC on Proposed Reallocation of 5.9 GHz Band

    March 9, 2020
    On March 9, CEI submitted comments to the FCC on its proposal to reallocate a portion of the 5.9 GHz band from Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) to unlicensed Wi-Fi. In recent years, the growth of Wi-Fi devices has congested the unlicensed bands immediately adjacent to the 5.9 GHz ITS band, creating tension between the automotive and telecommunication industries.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    March 9, 2020
    Coronavirus continued to spread, the Democratic presidential field significantly narrowed, and the former head of the UAW was charged with embezzlement. Meanwhile, agencies issued new final regulations ranging from electrical shock therapy to spiny dogfish specifications.
  • New York Times' Shoddy Reporting on Agency Skeptic

    March 6, 2020
    The New York Times recently ran an article titled “A Trump Insider Embeds Climate Denial in Scientific Research.” The fact-checkers and editors dropped the ball on this one, beginning with the title.
  • SEC’s Proposed Rules Would Take ETFs out of the Hands of Middle-Class Investors

    March 6, 2020
    CEI recently signed on to a coalition letter encouraging the Securities and Exchange Commission to abandon its plans to further regulate certain financial products and impose additional sales-practice rules between broker-dealers and investment advisors and their clients. These proposed rules would impose an intrusive and burdensome regulatory regime on financial markets and severely limit the ability of everyday investors to freely purchase or sell some publicly traded securities.
  • CEI Scholars Warn EARN IT Act Will Weaken Online Protections

    March 5, 2020
    Today, a bipartisan group of senators introduced the EARN IT Act, a bill that ties critical intermediary liability protections for online platforms, known as Section 230, to meeting yet-to-be-determined regulations regarding the spread of child sexual abuse material online. While the bill's goal is critically important, there are reasons to believe this legislation would backfire and is designed to accomplish other goals beyond its stated purpose, such as weakening online privacy protections powered by encryption.
  • Locusts Threatening African Food Supply; Greens Oppose Only Solution

    March 5, 2020
    As billions of desert locusts swarm through East Africa and into Asia threatening the food supply of millions, environmental activists want to ban and regulate the only effective tools to stop it: pesticides. Currently, aerial and ground-level spraying with organophosphates is the main, if not only, line of defense against the locusts.
  • Liberate to Stimulate 2020: Let’s Start with Trade

    March 5, 2020
    The past two weeks have seen a volatile market owing to concerns over coronavirus, which suggests an economic downturn could be on the cards. The administration can go some way toward heading this off with liberalization of trade.
  • Washington’s Latest Attack on Air Conditioning

    March 5, 2020
    Think air conditioning isn’t expensive enough? Then you’ll love a proposed amendment to the Senate energy bill that restricts the refrigerants used in millions of air conditioners on the grounds that they contribute to climate change.
  • Big-Mouth CEOs Less of a Threat than Crusading Politicians

    March 4, 2020
    Free-market advocates are understandably skeptical of “stakeholder” capitalism—the idea that corporate managers should focus not just on returns to shareholders, but on pleasing a potentially long list of other groups that claim an interest in the operations (and on the profits) of a company. Any given board and management team can apportion their own resources as they see fit, of course, but we small-government types are wary of theoretically voluntary guidelines for social and environmental awareness being transformed into binding legal requirements down the road.

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