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OpenMarket: Business and Government

  • How to Spot a #NeverNeeded Regulation

    April 13, 2020
    Not every regulation on the books is directly harming the COVID-19 response. There are a lot of other regulations that need reform, but the #NeverNeeded set deserves urgent action. To help policy makers identify which regulations are the most pressing, the Competitive Enterprise Institute has prepared a guide.
  • Robots Are Here to Make Your Job Safer and Cleaner

    April 10, 2020
    Positive stories about win-win results from the march of automation are everywhere in our economy, but they don’t get told and repeated enough. The workers who are told they should be the most worried about their jobs being stolen by robots are, in fact, the ones who will likely benefit the most from future jobs that will be safer and more pleasant.
  • How SEC Accounting Regulations Hindered National Stockpile—and Still May Be Doing So

    April 9, 2020
    In a new report, CEI experts outline #NeverNeeded regulations that are frustrating responses to the pandemic and its aftermath. Among those is an obscure Securities and Exchange Commission regulatory “guidance” document that may be hindering production and distribution of much-needed medical supplies.
  • Retro Review: The Year Civilization Collapsed

    April 6, 2020
    This review of Eric H. Cline’s 1177 B.C.: The Year Civilization Collapsed, was originally published at Inertia Wins. Despite covering events in the ancient past, Cline’s analysis is especially relevant to the present-day coronavirus response and the importance of supply chain diversity.
  • Retro Reviews: An Introduction

    April 6, 2020
    Political news and analysis always suffers from a recency bias—we tend to assume that the latest analysis and reportage is superior to what was posted yesterday, or last year. With that in mind, CEI is launching a new blog series called “Retro Reviews.” We’ll take a look back at the important writing of previous years (and decades) and do our best to extract the wisdom contained therein.
  • Antitrust Policy #NeverNeeded and Dangerous in a Crisis

    April 1, 2020
    The Justice Department and Federal Trade Commission will now allow some collaboration between companies to address the corona virus health threat. They also warned a frazzled business community that certain practices could still land them in antitrust hot water. The uncertainty will prevent some ideas from being tried and deny citizens the benefits of what could have been.
  • New York Times Explains Foolishness of Trump’s General Motors Nationalization

    March 30, 2020
    Last Friday, President Trump nationalized General Motors, ordering the company to produce as many ventilators as HHS Secretary Alex Azar says is necessary to address the coronavirus crisis. Bluster from the White House doesn’t magically retool factories and retrain workers. Worse, meddling from administration bureaucrats far outside their depth may depress and delay production.
  • Trump Administration Suspends Tariffs, but Not Confusion, for Three Months

    March 30, 2020
    On Friday evening, the Trump administration announced it would stop collecting all tariff revenue for three months, effective immediately. In ordinary times, the news would have been front page news for days. Instead, as with many late-Friday news dumps, it has gone virtually unnoticed.
  • The Guardian Props Up Lame Greenpeace Tirade, Ignores Potential COVID-19 Risks from Reusable Grocery Bags

    March 27, 2020
    The Guardian recently published a story on a Greenpeace attack on CEI for pointing out that reusable grocery bags might contain dangerous pathogens, including COVID-19. I have no problem with people who choose reusable bags, but it’s good for them to know that they need to be washed after every use. I do have a problem with government bans and regulations that force people to use reusable bags.
  • COVID-19 Relief Bill Passes without Frivolous Green Baggage

    March 27, 2020
    The Senate passed a $2 trillion COVID-19 relief and economic stimulus bill by a 96-0 vote. The House passed the bill by voice vote on March 27. The House Democrats’ bill was so radical and most of it had so little to do with addressing the current health crisis or the resulting economic crisis that it discredited the more modest attempts to add irrelevant wind and solar tax credits to the bill in the Senate.

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