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OpenMarket: Business and Government

  • REVIEW: 'Honorable Business' by Prof. James Otteson

    May 20, 2019
    I wrote up some initial impressions about the new book on business ethics, “Honorable Business: A Framework for Business in a Just and Humane Society,” recently, and now that I’ve finished it, I’m able to provide a fuller review.
  • VIDEO: Cheers to Food Truck Freedom

    May 17, 2019
    Congratulations to mobile food vendors Benny Diaz and Brian Peffer—and their attorneys at the Institute for Justice—for scoring a victory for freedom of food commerce in the Sunshine State. Thanks to an IJ legal challenge that began last year, it is now legal to operate a food truck in Fort Pierce, Florida.
  • Alice Rivlin, 1931-2019

    May 17, 2019
    Some economists do more than teach classes and write books. Alice Rivlin, who passed away this week, was proof. She was the first director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), from 1975 to 1983, serving under Presidents Ford, Carter, and Reagan. She helped develop many of the standards used for estimating how much legislation would cost if enacted. More importantly, she developed a reputation for keeping politicking out of the bill scoring.
  • White House Uses Discredited Complaints Tactic against Social Media Companies

    May 16, 2019
    My colleague Wayne Crews has already slammed the White House for a first step towards government regulation of online speech in its “tech bias” complaints portal. It is interesting that the administration has followed the model of the problematic Consumer Financial Protection Bureau in simply collecting complaints as proof of problems with the industry concerned.
  • Trade War State of Play: China, USMCA

    May 14, 2019
    If President Trump’s trade war has a single takeaway, it is this: Raising tariffs is an ineffective bargaining strategy. When the U.S. raises its tariffs, other countries always retaliate, and always become less cooperative.
  • VIDEO: Report Card on Regulatory Reform

    May 10, 2019
    Earlier this week I had the good fortune to spend some time at the historic Mayflower hotel here in Washington, D.C. attending the Federalist Society’s 7th Annual Executive Branch Review conference. Organizers had assembled an impressive array of government officials and legal experts to present on and debate the state of the nation’s Article II governance.
  • Breaking up and Regulating Facebook: Unfair, Un-American, Unacceptable

    May 9, 2019
    Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes, former publisher of The New Republic, argues in a long essay for The New York Times that the company should be broken up and regulated, and indeed that this would be the “American” thing to do.
  • Pop Federal Trade Commission's Dangerous Facebook Trial Balloon

    May 9, 2019
    Facebook is reportedly negotiating a settlement with a powerful regulatory agency that would impose a new corporate structure, increase liability for one or more executives, and take aim at the company financially. Important protections for civil and economic rights are in jeopardy. The precedent could be catastrophic for the next person confronting a regulatory agency without the personal resources of Mark Zuckerberg.
  • Trump Administration Ends Homecare Providers Dues Skim

    May 7, 2019
    Since 2000, state governments have diverted $1.4 billion from homecare providers and handed it to labor unions, according to the Freedom Foundation. For over a decade, states automatically deducted union dues payments from Medicaid payments intended for homecare providers who care for the elderly or disabled. Worse, most homecare providers care for family members on Medicaid. No one should be forced to fund a union when simply caring for a loved one.
  • Ex-Im Bank Revival?

    May 3, 2019
    Next week the Senate is expected to vote on new board members for the Export-Import Bank, which gives favorable financing terms to foreign governments and businesses when they buy U.S. products. Ex-Im’s charter expires on September 30. If Congress does not reauthorize it, Ex-Im would close its doors to new projects, wind down its portfolio, and then disappear entirely.

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