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OpenMarket: Regulatory Reform

  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    September 8, 2020
    COVID-19 deaths passed 200,000 in the United States. Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s passing sparked a fresh Supreme Court battle. A grand jury declined to press murder charges against the Louisville police officers who killed Breonna Taylor. The 2020 Federal Register topped 60,000 pages. Meanwhile, regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from Cuban assets to shrimp trawlers.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    September 8, 2020
    As Labor Day marked the unofficial end of summer, the unemployment rate went back down to 8.4 percent, and Attorney General Barr announced that the Justice Department will likely file an antitrust lawsuit against Google by the end of the month. Regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from relaxed DNA tolerance to semipostal stamps.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    August 31, 2020
    The last week saw another political convention, another police shooting, and two hurricanes. There was at least one major positive story, though. Polio has finally been eradicated from Africa, one of the last places on Earth where people were still suffering from it. It now exists only in Pakistan and Afghanistan. Regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from respirators to orbital debris.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    August 24, 2020
    The spring 2020 Unified Agenda was published on August 17. Due four months ago, it collects every rulemaking agency’s plans for upcoming regulations. The number of new rules this year surpassed 2,000 last week. Regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from cooking with energy to contact lens prescriptions.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    August 17, 2020
    Kamala Harris was announced as the Democratic dvice-presidential candidate, a massive storm swept through the Midwest, and Congress is out of session until September. The number of new final regulations is also set to pass 2,000 this week. Regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from powerline vegetation to risky plywood.
  • America’s “Unconstitutional Slop” Predates Trump’s Executive Actions on Pandemic Economic Relief

    August 11, 2020
    The logic of the administrative state dictates the expansion of itself in response to any crisis. Executive actions play a game rigged against limited government. Classical liberalism cannot win any more than it can win in other instances in which conservatives embrace the administrative state.
  • New CEI Video: Eliminating Never Needed Regulations to Help with Recovery

    August 10, 2020
    In a new CEI video, Kent Lassman talks about three things agencies can do rein in regulations that are hindering the COVID-19 response and making economic recovery even harder. Congress should establish an independent regulatory reduction commission. Agencies should go over their own rules and policies and prune them. And new rules should have automatic sunsets
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    August 10, 2020
    August’s 2020 disaster list so far includes a massive warehouse explosion in Beirut that killed more than 100 people and Hurricane Isaias. In positive news, Congress is out on its August recess, but could reconvene once the next COVID spending bill is negotiated. Regulatory agencies issued new regulations ranging from patent fees to squid specifications.
  • Cautious Optimism on July Jobs Numbers: Prudence, Resilience Will Aid Recovery

    August 7, 2020
    In July, 1.8 million new jobs were created, and the unemployment rate dropped to 10.2 percent. That is a welcome follow-up to the second quarter’s disastrous GDP decline, which was the steepest in American history. But there are threats to the recovery.
  • When Spending Is Regulation: The Grand Unification Theory of Government Growth

    August 6, 2020

    Alongside helplessness in the face of a looming $27 trillion debt, debating administrative state policy hasn’t been much help in forestalling federal government growth.

    We of the market or classical...

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