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OpenMarket: Regulatory Reform

  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    December 9, 2019
    The House began preparing articles of impeachment, President Trump announced new tariffs against three allies, a NATO summit was surprisingly contentious, and the federal government is less than two weeks away from a possible shutdown. Meanwhile, agencies published new regulations ranging from old railroads to South Sudanese mail.
  • What Regulations Did the Trump Administration Eliminate in 2019?

    December 6, 2019
    The Trump administration has issued its fiscal year 2019 status update on one-in, two-out. It’s called “Regulatory Reform Results for Fiscal Year 2019.” According to the administration, agencies issued 61 “significant deregulatory actions,” and 35 significant regulatory ones, for a ratio of 1.7 to 1. Close to one-in, two-out, but not quite.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    December 2, 2019
    While the nation celebrated Thanksgiving with family and friends, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from almond information to missile accidents.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    November 25, 2019
    Congress averted a government shutdown until December 20th by passing a continuing resolution. The Fall 2019 Unified Agenda was also released, which compiles all rulemaking agencies’ upcoming plans. Wayne Crews has more on that. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from college radio to redesignating unclassifiable areas.
  • Trump Regulatory Reform Agenda By the Numbers: End of One-In, Two-Out?

    November 20, 2019
    The Trump administration has released the Fall 2019 edition of the twice-yearly Unified Agenda of Federal Regulatory and Deregulatory Actions. Late and incomplete compared to the last year’s fall edition, there’s more analysis to come. Around since the early 1980s, the blockbuster Unified Agenda updates an excited world about regulatory priorities of the federal bureaucracy.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    November 18, 2019
    The 2019 Federal Register has already exceeded its page count during President Trump’s first year in office, with more than a month to spare and almost no activity in the month of January due to the federal shutdown. This week, Congress will likely avoid another shutdown by passing another Continuing Resolution to fund the government through an as-yet undetermined date.
  • Ex-Im Reauthorization Vote Today in the House

    November 15, 2019
    The House of Representatives will vote on reauthorizing the Export-Import Bank today. Even if Ex-Im is reauthorized, the fight over it has already yielded a significant nearly five-year-long victory, in savings to taxpayers, with greater chances for victory in the future.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    November 11, 2019
    The number of new regulations this year passed 2,500 last week, and the Federal Register surpassed 60,000 pages. This week could see big news on everything from a possible trade deal with China to impeachment testimony. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from handling Florida tomatoes to rural telephone banks.
  • VIDEO: Growth and Opportunity in the Beehive State

    November 8, 2019
    I’ve been interested in the work at the Center for Growth and Opportunity (CGO) at Utah State University for some time now, and I was very impressed with what I experienced at a fascinating one-day conference they recently co-hosted on emerging issues in technology policy. The details of that discussion were off the record, but I can say that their smart, practical, and non-partisan take was a refreshing treat.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    November 4, 2019
    Washington had one of its best weeks in recent memory. The Nationals won the World Series, and Congress is taking the next two weeks off. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from the new Domestic Hemp Production Program to snack font size.

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