You are here

OpenMarket: Regulatory Reform

  • Re-Prioritizing Regulatory Reform

    May 8, 2019
    The 2019 edition of Wayne Crews’ Ten Thousand Commandments: An Annual Snapshot of the Federal Regulatory State is out now.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    May 6, 2019
    Not one, but two potential Federal Reserve Board nominees withdrew from consideration last week, and economic growth and unemployment remained in excellent health. Meanwhile, with the 2019 Federal Register poised to exceed 20,000 pages this week, rulemaking agencies issued new regulations from TV channel lineups to postal products.
  • Congressional Democratic Leaders Meet with President on Infrastructure Bill

    May 3, 2019
    Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and other congressional Democrats met with President Trump on April 30 to discuss an infrastructure package. Unfortunately, Schumer and Pelosi released a letter to the president prior to their meeting that suggested that, rather than streamlining the permitting process, they want to make it more cumbersome by tacking on additional climate change-related requirements. 
  • Republican Study Committee Releases 2020 Budget Proposal

    May 1, 2019
    Congress is supposed to pass an annual spending budget, though it rarely gets around to it. Instead, the government is usually funded through a mashup of individual appropriations bills, omnibus appropriations bills, and continuing resolutions. This makes government spending less transparent and less accountable. It also leaves the federal government vulnerable to shutdowns during political fights, which happened in January of this year.
  • Costs of Unequal Treatment of Citizens by Abandoning Negative Rights for a Positive Rights Framework

    May 1, 2019
    To many classical liberals (or libertarians), it is primarily the individual’s right of self-defense that is delegated to a government. We cannot unilaterally commence the exercise force against a peaceful person, and so cannot delegate that non-existent power of forcing other people to do the things we want them to do. This principle prevents citizens from violating one another’s rights and expands human liberty.  
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    April 29, 2019
    While Washington’s “This Town” types geared up for the White House Correspondents’ Dinner, the rest of the country flocked to movie theaters for a much more realistic and wholesome form of entertainment—“Avengers: Endgame.” Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies issued new regulations from Mushroom Council membership to hydroelectric licenses.
  • White House Moves to Strengthen Information Quality Act

    April 26, 2019
    The White House Office of Management and Budget on April 24th sent a memo to heads of departments and agencies updating guidelines for implementing the Information Quality Act of 1999. My first impression is that the updates look like they improve in several respects the way the IQA should be used.
  • New Civil Liberties Alliance Sounds Alarm on Unconstitutional Government

    April 25, 2019
    The New Civil Liberties Alliance hosted a very interesting event this week, as part of its “Lunch and Law” speaker series, featuring remarks by Hudson Institute Distinguished Fellow Chris DeMuth and American Enterprise Institute Senior Fellow Peter Wallison.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    April 22, 2019
    The Notre Dame cathedral in Paris caught fire and sustained heavy damage. The rebuilding will likely take years, though people began politicizing it almost instantly. In other news, the Mueller report was publicly released on Thursday. Cable news networks on both sides of the partisan divide, in a show of unity, have reportedly agreed to report on nothing else for the remainder of 2019. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies issued new regulations from synthetic cannibinoids to grapefruit grading.
  • Blocking the T-Mobile-Sprint Merger: Competition, Rent-Seeking, and Uncertainty

    April 19, 2019
    Nationwide 5G networks are coming. They will expand possibilities for everything from smartphone applications to GPS to streaming video, and will enable new technologies that have not yet been invented. President Trump wants the U.S. to be a world leader in 5G adoption. But his Justice Department’s antitrust division might hinder that goal by blocking the proposed merger between Sprint and T-Mobile.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: Regulatory Reform