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OpenMarket: Trade and International

  • Ex-Im Bank Revival?

    May 3, 2019
    Next week the Senate is expected to vote on new board members for the Export-Import Bank, which gives favorable financing terms to foreign governments and businesses when they buy U.S. products. Ex-Im’s charter expires on September 30. If Congress does not reauthorize it, Ex-Im would close its doors to new projects, wind down its portfolio, and then disappear entirely.
  • House Has No Jurisdiction over Paris Agreement

    April 5, 2019
    If you have ever wondered whether Democratic leaders understand the U.S. Constitution when they bash President Trump for allegedly violating it, or just use “unconstitutional” as a mantra for opposing policies (or 2016 election winners) they don’t like, ponder no further. H.R. 9, the “Climate Action Now Act,” exposes House leaders as faux guardians of America’s basic charter of government.
  • VIDEO: Bitter Taste of Big Sugar's Corporate Welfare

    April 5, 2019
    John Stossel and the team at Reason TV have a new video out on the expensive and wasteful federal sugar program, which benefits a tiny handful of wealthy families while raising prices for everyone else. 
  • Response to Conservative Supporter of Kigali Amendment

    March 29, 2019
    The Kigali Amendment is a United Nations environmental measure proposed by the Obama administration, and that ought to be reason enough for conservatives to be skeptical of it. A close look at the Kigali Amendment’s provisions, which restrict refrigerants it deems contributors to climate change, confirms that it is a very bad deal for consumers and businesses that rely on air-conditioning and refrigeration.  
  • America’s Tech Regulators Should Not Follow Europe's Lead

    March 26, 2019
    This week The Economist endorsed European “tech doctrine”—a combination of antitrust, tax, privacy, and regulatory policies that is rapidly being imposed on a mostly American tech sector seemingly powerless to resist it. The magazine said, “If the doctrine works, it could benefit millions of users, boost the economy, and constrain tech giants that have gathered immense power without a commensurate sense of responsibility.” That’s a big “if.” American regulators should avoid this doctrine like the plague.
  • Brexit Brinkmanship

    March 21, 2019
    There is plenty of blame to go around for Britain’s current Brexit chaos. In a recent post, I pointed to how the Prime Minister’s handling of the withdrawal negotiations was simply incompetent, but at least some of the blame should now be handed over to the House of Commons, which has failed to produce a majority for any course of action.
  • VIDEO: Raising the Steaks on Jones Act Reform

    March 15, 2019
    Our friends at the Cato Institute are continuing their valiant fight against the wasteful protectionism of the Jones Act, a 99-year old law that requires cargo ships servicing U.S. ports to be entirely U.S.-owned and crewed. Many readers may remember when it briefly shed its usual obscurity in 2017 when the Trump administration agreed to temporarily waive its requirements in order to aid recovery efforts in Puerto Rico in the wake of Hurricane Maria.
  • Florida Bill Shines Light on Union Subsidy

    March 6, 2019
    Taxpayer dollars should be used to benefit the general public, not special interest groups. Yet, the state of Florida doles out a massive subsidy to government unions on an annual basis. This subsidy is known as union release time and permits public employees to perform union business on the taxpayer dime.
  • Three Reasons Kigali Amendment Favors China over America

    March 5, 2019
    Beginning in the 1970s, many policymakers became concerned that the refrigerants used in most air conditioners and refrigerators were leaking into the air and depleting the Earth’s ozone layer. This led to the negotiation and signing of the Montreal Protocol, a 1987 United Nations treaty phasing out the use of these chemicals.
  • Trade, Job Losses, and Comparable Wages

    March 1, 2019
    One of the frequent objections posted by those who are concerned about free trade is that it leads to job losses. This is true. However, saying that free trade causes job losses does not tell us very much. In this post I will try to put trade job losses in context, and then examine what is probably the more important policy question—what to do for those who lose their jobs to trade?

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