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OpenMarket: Trade and International

  • Best Books of 2018: Clashing over Commerce

    December 27, 2018
    Douglas Irwin’s magnum opus, published at the end of 2017, is already a classic. Given the prominent role trade is playing in politics right now, it is also very timely. At almost 700 pages, “Clashing over Commerce” looks intimidating. But once you start reading, it isn’t. Irwin tells a coherent story that spans generations, showcasing the prominent personalities in the great trade debate, their larger philosophical and economic arguments, and the legislation and policies they fought over. It hits on all levels.
  • Year in Review 2018: Trade Policy

    December 24, 2018
    2018 was the year in which President Trump began to implement his campaign promises of using tariffs to change America’s trade policy. The ostensible reason was to protect American jobs and industries. In so doing, the President jettisoned his party’s long-standing adherence to free-market principles. It appears that this is one of several changes that represent the beginnings of a political realignment that may well be global in nature.
  • Best Books of 2018: Factfulness

    December 20, 2018
    Think Julian Simon, Matt Ridley, and Steven Pinker’s data-driven optimism, mixed with Michael Shermer and Bryan Caplan’s awareness of human cognitive biases, as told by a kindly, avuncular Norwegian. The book reads easily, is visually savvy, and has a friendly, non-polemic tone.
  • Report from United Nations Climate Conference: Heckling the Hecklers

    December 11, 2018
    Katowice, Poland—“Le temps est mauvais,” an African delegate told a colleague as they wrapped themselves up against the early evening chill. The weather wasn’t as leaden and directionless as inside the twenty-fourth Conference of the Parties (COP-24) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.
  • U.S.-China Trade Deal at G20 Small Move in Right Direction

    December 3, 2018
    Nobody knew what to expect going into the G20 summit in Argentina, especially from a planned meeting between Chinese President Xi Jinping and U.S. President Donald Trump. The headlines coming out of the meeting are largely positive. China is ending its 40 percent tariff on U.S.-made autos, while the U.S. will delay for 90 days a rise in tariffs on $200 billion of Chinese goods from 10 percent to 25 percent, previously scheduled for January 1.
  • Britain’s Treaty of Versailles

    November 28, 2018
    “Vote leave, take control” was the slogan of the “leave” campaign during the run-up to the vote on whether the United Kingdom should exit the European Union. Despite this, British Prime Minister Theresa May has negotiated a deal with the European Union that cedes further control over British law to the EU, and has given the EU a veto over Britain extracting itself from the deal.
  • GM Layoffs, Tariffs, and Subsidies

    November 28, 2018
    CEI's Ryan Young explores the lessons policymakers should learn from General Motors’ announcement of layoffs and plant closures.
  • The Montreal Protocol—Did it Really Make a Difference?

    November 9, 2018
    An executive summary of the latest scientific compendium on ozone depletion, the Scientific Assessment of Ozone Depletion: 2018 is now out. The report was released in conjunction with the major meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances That Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol), currently underway in Quito, Ecuador. 
  • U.S. Officials Wary of United Nations Ozone Treaty Negotiations in Ecuador

    November 7, 2018

    The 30th meeting of the parties to the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer (Montreal Protocol) is being held in Quito Ecuador through November 9th. This 1987 United Nations treaty banned a number of compounds widely used in refrigeration and air conditioning on the grounds that they leak into the air and contribute to depletion of the earth’s ozone layer.

  • What Do the Midterms Mean for Trade?

    November 7, 2018

    Trade was a highly contentious issue during President Trump’s first two years. He has doubled tariffs, other countries have enacted equivalent retaliatory tariffs, and tensions are unlikely to ease anytime soon. This unease will not change under a newly divided Congress. The midterm elections will have significant implications for trade policy in the short, medium, and long runs.

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