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OpenMarket: Energy and Environment

  • Junk Food Blogging

    November 16, 2006
    Sandy Szwarc, a registered nurse, certified culinary professional, CEI friend, and all around good person, recently started a blog on the science of food -- especially so called "junk food." On her blog, you can read all about "the science that mainstream media doesn't report and how to critically think about the junk they do that's not fit to swallow." You can also read some of the pieces she's written for CEI here and here. Happy blogging, Sandy. http://www.junkfoodscience.blogspot.com/
  • Power Lies

    November 16, 2006
    The lede of this Washington Post article ["Loudoun Excluded From Utility Route"] is jarring to me:
    Dominion Virginia Power has excluded most of Loudoun County as a potential route for a power line in northwestern Virginia, putting to rest fears that steel lattice towers and high-voltage cables would slice through parts of the county with deep natural and historic significance.
    We're supposed to feel "fear" because of pretended offended aesthetics? What about the "historical significance" of electric power itself? Iain Murray's oped ["What Will We Do When America's Lights Go Out?"] on the sorry shape of our electricity infrastructure-- unwieldy...
  • Is DailyKos a tool of big oil?

    November 15, 2006
    Some may think that; we couldn't possibly comment.
  • Beyond Petroleum?

    November 15, 2006
    Today's Washington Post carries a full-page ad by BP boasting that the company, which calls itself “beyond petroleum,” is “investing up to $8 billion over the next ten years in solar, wind, natural gas and hydrogen to provide low carbon electricity.” “By 2015,” the ad continues, “we estimate that our business will eliminate CO2 emissions by 24 million metric tons a year. It's a start.” Let's put this in perspective. According to the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), world CO2 emissions in 2004 totaled 27,043 million metric tons. EIA projects that world CO2 emissions will increase to 33,663 million metric tons by 2015. So BP is investing $8 billion to eliminate 7/100ths of 1% of annual CO2 emissions in 2015. Instead of...
  • We know how he feels

    November 15, 2006
    Tony Blair is resisting demands from the environmental pressure groups and, err, the Conservative Party to impose annual targets on greenhouse gas emissions for the quite sensible reasons that this will be disastrous for British industry. The other party speaking sense on the issue is the UK Independence Party, which is now the closest thing the land of Margaret Thatcher has to a libertarian party. Coincidentally, a Conservative MP described global warming in the following terms today:
    "Climate Change is the defining issue of our age. Previous generations had to deal with the rise of Nazism or communism. This is the issue on which my generation of...
  • Samuelson on Stern: “…a masterpiece of misleading public relations”

    November 10, 2006
    Washington Post columnist Robert Samuelson has a bracing take on the Stern Review on the Economics of Climate Change today:
    [Based on the report's findings] no one could fail to conclude that we should conquer global warming instantly, if not sooner. Who could disagree? Well, me. Stern's headlined conclusions are intellectual fictions. They're essentially fabrications to justify an aggressive anti-global-warming agenda. The danger of that is we'd end up with the worst of both worlds: a program that harms the economy without doing much to cut greenhouse gases. Let me throw some messy realities onto Stern's tidy picture. In the debate over global warming, there's a big gap between public rhetoric (which verges on hysteria) and public behavior (which indicates...
  • Warming Watch in the Senate

    November 10, 2006
    Barbara Boxer is slated to replace James Inhofe as chair of the Senate Environment and Public Works committee, and she's got big plans for global warming legislation. According to the Associated Press, "a top environmental aide at the White House signaled Thursday that the administration would work with Boxer."
  • Thank Goodness for California

    November 9, 2006
    One of the least mentioned election day stories is that California - yes, California - rejected a punitive tax on oil production that would have funded alternative energy research:
    Proposition 87 was portrayed as a battle between liberal Hollywood and Big Oil in a state that has long blazed a trail in environmental causes and has one of the most aggressive greenhouse gas reduction laws in the world. But the measure, which was bankrolled in large part by real estate heir and Hollywood producer Stephen Bing and would tax oil production in California for the first time, was criticized as likely to raise energy prices for consumers. And Californians, who already pay some of the highest gas prices in the country, were seen as reluctant to tack on another tax, even in the name of progress...
    Even the Los AngelesTimes, which tends to lean left in...
  • Oh, the Humanity!

    November 8, 2006
    Perhaps the most amusing moment of last night's election coverage came from Chris Matthews, while he was interviewing congressional has-been Dick Gephardt. Let's go to the transcript:
    MATTHEWS: We have a lot of regular people in the U.S. House of Representatives. And I'm about to introduce a former member of the House who was a very regular guy, although he has advanced degrees from great universities, Dick Gephardt. Thank you, sir. GEPHARDT: Good to be with you. MATTHEWS: Well, you haven't gotten fat like a lot of ex-politicians. I'll give you that. I saw Gore the other night. I couldn't believe it. I thought I was seeing the Hindenburg coming by. And there you are; You're looking great. How's Jane? GEPHARDT: She's...
  • Kyoto Conference Reveals Disagreements

    November 7, 2006
    For all the supposed consensus on global warming, every time the Kyoto parties get together, there are disagreement s about what to do. The latest meeting in Nairobi, Kenya, is no exception: “A U.N. conference working to fix long-term rules to fight global warming beyond 2012 “as soon as possible” was split on Tuesday over whether that meant an accord should be struck in 2008, 2009 or even 2010.” At the last meeting, the only thing they agreed on was to take out all the penalties for non-compliance with Kyoto. This was hailed as an ‘historic agreement.' CEI confidently predicts that whatever agreement they come to on when to set a deadline for further talks will also be hailed as an ‘historic agreement.' Meanwhile, Annex I parties will continue to emit greenhouse gases at an increasing rate.

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