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OpenMarket: Jessica Melugin

  • Net Neutrality Regulation Still a Bad Idea

    February 7, 2019
    The debate at today’s House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing was largely between making blocking, throttling, and fast lanes illegal and going further to also place the Internet under heavy-handed Title II authority.
  • Agenda for the 116th Congress: Tech and Telecom

    January 28, 2019
    As technology and telecommunications evolve, new challenges inevitably arise for policy makers. New mandates or prohibitions should be avoided in all but the most exceptional circumstances. Ill-conceived rules could stifle the high-tech economy, saddling innovative firms with arbitrary regulations or draconian liability regimes.
  • New Cable Franchise Rules to Benefit Consumers

    January 24, 2019
    In September of last year, the Federal Communications Commission issued a further notice of proposed rulemaking clarifying how the amount that cities are allowed to charge cable companies in franchise fees is calculated. If these changes are adopted, it will be much to the benefit of consumers.
  • End of the Road for Net Neutrality Comeback Attempt

    January 4, 2019
    The end of the 115th Congress meant the end of using the Congressional Review Act to void the Federal Communication Commission’s repeal of Obama-era net neutrality regulation. Sadly, advocates of more government control over the Internet will almost surely try to pass new net neutrality legislation in the new Congress. And just as the old regulations were bad for innovation, news ones legislators may dream up in 2019 will likely be a detriment to consumers if enacted.
  • Year in Review 2018: Internet Sales Tax

    December 26, 2018
    On June 21, 2018, in South Dakota v. Wayfair, the U.S. Supreme Court reversed fifty years of precedent by allowing states to collect sales taxes from businesses located completely outside that states’ borders. Allowing this remote taxation undercut healthy tax competition among the states, introduced the threat of crippling compliance costs for smaller online retailers, and emboldened 31 states to move forward with their sales tax expansion plans.
  • Best Books of 2018: Life after Google

    December 24, 2018
    Are Tucker Carlson’s predictions of Google taking over the future keeping you up at night? Sooth yourself with the creative destruction described in “Life after Google: The Fall of Big Data and the Rise of the Blockchain Economy” by George Gilder. The famous economist, writer, investor, and tech guru argues that Google’s days of aggregate and advertise success are numbered and goes into considerable depth about why.
  • Last-Minute Delay in CVS-Aetna Deal Could Threaten Consumer Benefits

    December 6, 2018
    U.S. District Court Judge Richard Leon surprised many on Monday when he announced he may halt the integration of CVS pharmacy’s assets with the nation’s third largest healthcare insurance company, Aetna. Usually the judicial review of a merger already approved by the Department of Justice is a mere formality, as evidenced by the fact that the companies went ahead and closed the $69 billion deal late last month, but at a hearing Monday, Judge Leon said he has concerns about the merger’s consequences for consumers.
  • Discard Static Market Analysis, Let Sprint and T-Mobile Merge

    October 18, 2018

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute has been making a convincing case for a swift and condition-free approval from regulators of the proposed Sprint and T-Mobile merger since the beginning. It’s always nice, however, when someone from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology agrees with you. A recent study from MIT research associate Dr. William Lehr makes some of the points we’ve been advocating here on the blog and out in the ...

  • U.S. Justice Department Challenges California Net Neutrality Rules

    October 1, 2018

    The Justice Department is suing California over the state’s just-signed net neutrality law. Rightly so, as it’s hard to imagine a market that better fits the definition of ‘interstate.’ The Internet crosses state and local lines countless times everyday and that means its regulation is a matter for the feds, not states or localities. 


  • Supreme Court Devastates Small Online Businesses and Consumers in South Dakota v. Wayfair

    June 21, 2018

    Today’s Supreme Court decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair is extremely disappointing and will likely cost online sellers and consumers dearly. Stopping state regulatory and tax power at each state’s border should be the default rule for online commerce, but the court has chosen to set state tax authorities loose on small Internet retailers and their customers across the country.


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