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OpenMarket: Matt Patterson

  • Government of unions, by unions, for unions

    August 23, 2012
    The Washington Times

    In 2009, the U.S. government bailed out the auto industry, ostensibly to save the livelihoods of thousands of Americans who work for automakers and their supporting companies.

    Sounds nice, except that this federal largesse was not distributed equally. In fact, some employees who were also members of the powerful, politically influential United Auto Workers (UAW) union got far, far better treatment from Uncle Sam than their nonunion brethren.

    That was exactly what happened to ...
  • Union contracts driving pension crisis

    August 14, 2012
    The Washington Examiner

    Maryland's $37 billion public pension system earned a pitiful 0.36 percent return on its investments last fiscal year.

    How embarrassing is that? Even the fiscal basket case that is California was able to eke out a 1 percent return. Indeed, the news for Maryland looks "like a minor disaster for fiscal 2011," in the prosaic words of Jeff Hooke, chairman of the Maryland Tax Education Foundation. That's a lot like saying the Trojan War was a minor disagreement over a girl.

    Sadly there's no brave and clever Odysseus waiting in the wings to save Maryland. Instead, state...
  • Teachers Unions Defend Institutional Incompetence

    August 8, 2012
    Openmarket.org

    No good deed goes unpunished.

    Take Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s brave decision to lay off 3,600 employees — including teachers and principals — of 24 of New York City’s worst-performing schools, all with an eye toward rebooting them with new staff, management plans, and curricula. The outgoing staff were told they could reapply, but would have to compete with thousands of new applicants. The goal: Turn around the schools by turning them inside out.

    Naturally, the teachers’ unions pitched a fit, and have done everything they can to thwart the Mayor’s plan.

    The irony is that, as is so often the case...
  • Teachers Unions Defend Institutional Incompetence

    August 8, 2012
    No good deed goes unpunished.

    Take Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s brave decision to lay off 3,600 employees -- including teachers and principals -- of 24 of New York City's worst-performing schools, all with an eye toward rebooting them with new staff, management plans, and curricula. The outgoing staff were told they could reapply, but would have to compete with thousands of new applicants. The goal: Turn around the schools by turning them inside out.

    Naturally, the teachers’ unions pitched a fit, and have done everything they can to thwart the Mayor’s plan.

    The irony is that, as is so often the case, unions brought this pain on themselves. Bloomberg’s original plan was to institute a comprehensive instructor evaluation plan in order to, as The Wall Street Journal...
  • Obama’s jobs council a total flop

    August 3, 2012
    The Washington Times

    When President Obama's Council on Jobs and Competitiveness last gathered in January, he boasted, “This has not been a show council. This has been a work council. I have been tracking implementation of [the council‘s] recommendations. And we’ve seen substantial progress across the board.”

    Substantial progress? Six months after that meeting, unemployment...
  • Bloomberg Calls for Anarchy

    July 25, 2012
    Openmarket.org

    Here we go.  Another mass shooting, another round of mass stupidity from progressive politicians and pundits.

    Latest example:  In the wake of the horrific shootings in Aurora, Colorado, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg appeared to advocate a suspension of Constitution and the imposition of military-style oligarchy.  Speaking to CNN’s Piers Morgan about the necessity of more stringent gun laws in the wake...
  • Bloomberg Calls for Anarchy

    July 25, 2012
    Here we go.  Another mass shooting, another round of mass stupidity from progressive politicians and pundits.

    Latest example:  In the wake of the horrific shootings in Aurora, Colorado, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg appeared to advocate a suspension of Constitution and the imposition of military-style oligarchy.  Speaking to CNN’s Piers Morgan about the necessity of more stringent gun laws in the wake of the Colorado murders, Bloomberg made an astonishing declaration:

    “I don't understand why the police officers across this country don't stand up collectively and say, we're going to go on strike. We're not going to protect you. Unless you, the public, through your legislature, do what's required to keep us safe.'”

    Rarely does an elected...
  • Robert De Niro Admits Progressivism Kills Economies

    July 18, 2012
    Question: What do you get when a left-leaning state enlists a progressive celebrity to brag about how un-leftist the state is?

    Answer: The hilarious new commercial from New York's Empire State Development, in which Robert De Niro, star of such classic motion pictures as Analyze That, The Adventures of Rocky & Bullwinkle, Meet the Fockers, and Shark Tale, plays shill for the Empire State's pathetic attempt to re-brand itself as "business friendly."

    The commercial features shots of classic New...
  • Scott Walker, Union Slayer

    July 7, 2012
    Capital Research Center

    On January 3, 2011, Scott Walker was sworn in as Wisconsin’s new governor. The state’s finances were a mess; the economy stalled. Walker addressed the crisis head on that cold, January day, telling the crowd:

    “What is failing us is not our people or our places. What is failing us is the expanse of government. But we can do something about it right here, right now, today.”

    And the Governor proved true to his word. Within weeks he moved to tackle the driving factor behind his government’s “expanse”—the Badger State’s public employee infrastructure, specifically, the union-driven, gold-plated contracts. In particular, the cost of state employee health plans had risen 90 percent since 2002. Clearly the state needed a restructuring of the relationship between government and its work force....
  • Sunday Reflection: After the recall, big trouble for Big Labor

    July 2, 2012
    The Washington Examiner

    When it rains it pours, and right now organized labor is getting drenched.

    On June 5, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker survived a union-driven recall election, drubbing his opponent 53 to 46 percent in spite of his organized labor opponents mobilizing millions of dollars and "50,000 volunteers who knocked on 1.4 million doors and placed 1.8 million calls," according to the Washington Post.

    Walker had enraged his state's public-sector unions when he pushed through a series of collective bargaining reforms in 2011 -- reforms that saved the state and its municipalities millions but...

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