You are here

OpenMarket: Ryan Young

  • Introducing Antitrust Basics

    June 17, 2019
    Often, a drips-and-drabs approach to learning an issue over a period of time is as effective as a single intense cram session. To that end, this post inaugurates a series to familiarize readers over time with the basics of antitrust regulation. This is important because the current antitrust revival is reaching a fever pitch.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations  

    June 17, 2019
    Last week, a Canadian team won the NBA championship for the first time, while an American team won the Stanley Cup. This week brings us the Competitive Enterprise Institute 35th Anniversary Dinner and Reception. Meanwhile, agencies published new regulations ranging from Segelflugzeugbau to e-cigarettes.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    June 10, 2019
    While the administration is so far keeping to its one-in, two-out policy for proposed rules, new trade and antitrust policies are likely to increase net burdens by billions of dollars. The nation also celebrated National Donut Day, a Competitive Enterprise Institute favorite. Meanwhile, agencies published new regulations ranging from video calls to flying to Cuba.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    June 3, 2019
    President Trump threatened a new tariff on all Mexican goods, potentially scuttling the NAFTA/USMCA agreement. My colleague Wayne Crews went through the new Spring 2019 Unified Agenda and found 3,791 new regulations in the pipeline, and the 2019 Federal Register surpassed 25,000 pages. Meanwhile, during a four-day week due to Memorial Day, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from anchovies to inertia locking devices.
  • Addressing the Gender Pay Gap: Culture, Not Legislation

    May 31, 2019
    Gender discrimination is a complex problem with a complex solution.
  • Trump Threatens up to 25 Percent Tariff on Mexican Goods, Jeopardizes NAFTA/USMCA

    May 31, 2019
    Things have been moving quickly on President Trump’s top legislative priority, the NAFTA/USMCA trade agreement. The key was rescinding steel and aluminum tariffs against Canada and Mexico. On Wednesday, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau moved to introduce the agreement to Canada’s legislature for ratification, prompting a Thursday visit from Vice President Mike Pence. Also on Thursday, Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador (AMLO for short) introduced NAFTA/USMCA in Mexico’s Senate.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    May 27, 2019
    The number of new final regulations this year topped 1,000 last Tuesday, and President Trump and Congress entered Memorial Day weekend at odds on issues ranging from infrastructure to the renegotiated NAFTA/USMCA trade agreement. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies marked the unofficial start of summer with new regulations ranging from temporary safety zones to potato handling.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations 

    May 20, 2019
    The Game of Thrones finale aired last night, though the show’s less-plausible Washington spinoff appears set to continue indefinitely, and with a rather larger budget. In related trivia, dragons appear in twenty-five Federal Register documents so far this year, or more than one per week. The number of new regulations this year will also likely top one thousand next week. Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies issued new regulations ranging from nursery industry guides to package delivery signatures.
  • Trump Mostly Removes Steel, Aluminum Tariffs against Mexico, Canada: Barriers Still Higher than in 2017

    May 17, 2019
    The Trump administration is mostly lifting its steel aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico, effective 48 hours from today’s announcement. But metal tariffs will remain higher than they were just 14 months ago. They have raised consumer prices for cars, housing, and washing machines, while preventing passage of President Trump's signature revised NAFTA/USMCA trade agreement. Even now, passage is not guaranteed. 
  • Alice Rivlin, 1931-2019

    May 17, 2019
    Some economists do more than teach classes and write books. Alice Rivlin, who passed away this week, was proof. She was the first director of the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), from 1975 to 1983, serving under Presidents Ford, Carter, and Reagan. She helped develop many of the standards used for estimating how much legislation would cost if enacted. More importantly, she developed a reputation for keeping politicking out of the bill scoring.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: Posts by Ryan Young