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OpenMarket: Angela Logomasini

  • Registering Some Problems With REACH

    October 11, 2006
    The Wall Street Journal reports today that U.S. and European
    firms were unsuccessful in an attempt to make the proposed chemicals policy in
    Europe more affordable during committee consideration of the bill in the EU
    Parliament. But even if business had succeeded in reducing paperwork
    costs, the policy would still have adverse effects around the world.

    The program, known as REACH—for the registration,
    authorization, and evaluation of chemicals—would require companies to register chemicals
    they produce, import, or use. The paperwork
    alone will be expensive, but the program is also likely to produce expensive
    bans and other regulations on many chemicals.

    Industry has continually tried to make REACH a more
    reasonable program, but unfortunately they are fighting a losing battle.
    The problem is that REACH is fundamentally flawed and thus, cannot be fixed.

    First, REACH attempts to address...
  • Pesticide Bans No Minor Mistake

    October 5, 2006
    Tina's
    Rosenberg's article in today's New York
    Times
    addresses the devastating impact that misguided bans of the pesticide
    DDT have had on people in developing nations. The New York Times presents
    the DDT issue as simply a serious policy mistake. But it's not simply a single mistake—it's
    part of a dangerous effort by environmental activists around the world to
    deprive people of various life-saving technologies. The DDT case alone should discredit these
    groups, yet they continue to have a harmful influence on public policy.

    Despite
    the problems DDT bans have caused, environmental activists have successfully
    advanced a worldwide ban on DDT under the Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants
    (known as the POPs Treaty). The
    treaty has been ratified in enough nations for it to take effect, and the
    United States Senate plans to ratify it soon. It allows for only limited...
  • The New York Times Gets Chemical Plant Security Wrong

    September 25, 2006
    Why do liberals always assume that the solution to every
    problem is regulation and yet more regulation? That's the thrust of an
    editorial in today's New York Times that whines: “Congress still has done
    nothing to protect Americans from a terrorist attack on chemical plants.” It assumes that Congress has some magical
    answer to the issue members refuse to employ because of chemical industry lobbying. It also wrongly claims that nothing has been
    done to protect these plants.

    Consider the evidence first. All the answers that Congress has considered largely involve growing the
    federal bureaucracy with needless paperwork and meddling in production
    processes of which they have no knowledge. Indeed, the chemical plant security issue has mostly been used as an
    excuse for environmental activists and their allies in Congress to push an environmental
    agenda to reduce or eliminate the use...
  • REACH: Coming to a Shore Near You

    September 6, 2006
    When it comes to regulatory policy, it seems that among the
    few voices of reason in the Europe today is an American. In today's Wall
    Street Journal
    Europe, U.S. Ambassador to the EU, C. Boyden Gray, has outlined
    the inanity of the proposed chemicals policy—the so called REACH policy—that
    European legislators are expected to pass into law before the new year.

    REACH is the acronym for the appropriately bureaucratic name
    of the policy: Registration, Evaluation, and Authorization, of Chemicals.
    Yes—believe it or not—some companies will undergo that many
    bureaucratic steps before doing business in Europe. The program is based
    on the precautionary principle, which demands that firms prove their products
    safe before introducing them into commerce—a standard that is impossible to
    meet. The result is will likely be arbitrary bans and regulations on many
    politically unpopular...

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