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OpenMarket: Trey Kovacs

  • Regulators Find Uber Drivers to Be Independent Contractors

    May 15, 2019
    Determining the proper legal worker classification for an individual has become an arduous task. A major reason for the difficulty is a patchwork of federal and state laws that define the term employee and therefore independent contractor differently. More than ten different tests are applied among federal agencies and courts for defining the term employee.
  • Hearing Discusses Boosting Union Coercive Powers

    May 9, 2019
    Democrats in Congress are pushing the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act H.R. 2474, which seeks to strip workers of long-held protections and bolster the coercive power of labor unions. On May 8th, the House Subcommittee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions held a hearing to discuss this union wish list bill.
  • Trump Administration Ends Homecare Providers Dues Skim

    May 7, 2019
    Since 2000, state governments have diverted $1.4 billion from homecare providers and handed it to labor unions, according to the Freedom Foundation. For over a decade, states automatically deducted union dues payments from Medicaid payments intended for homecare providers who care for the elderly or disabled. Worse, most homecare providers care for family members on Medicaid. No one should be forced to fund a union when simply caring for a loved one.
  • House Democrats Introduce Union Gift Bag Bill

    May 3, 2019
    The Protecting Workers’ Right to Organize (PRO) Act puts the interests of labor unions over workers. Each provision of the bill either grants unions greater coercive powers, restricts worker choice, or increases the likelihood of industrial strife.
  • Two-Tier Wage System Highlights Need for Labor Reform

    April 22, 2019
    Over the weekend, the eleven-day strike by more than 30,000 Stop & Shop employees ended. The grocery chain announced that it “has reached fair new tentative agreements with UFCW Locals 328, 371, 919, 1445 and 1459, which represent our 31,000 associates in Massachusetts, Connecticut and Rhode Island.”
  • Union Membership Post-Janus

    April 8, 2019
    It has been difficult to gauge the impact of the landmark Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME. In this ruling, the Supreme Court held that forcing non-members to pay fees to a union as a condition of employment is a violation of the First Amendment. Predictions on the fallout from Janus ran the gamut. Some predicted a mass exodus, while other believed few public workers would resign their membership.
  • Employers Good Deeds Punished by Administrative State

    April 5, 2019
    Progressives—Democratic elected officials, community organizers, and labor unions—incessantly disparage employers for failing to provide employees with a living wage, adequate time off, and quality health benefits. They claim corporate greed is the cause of the eroding middle class.
  • Federal Agency Seeks to Create Direct Path for Ousting Unwanted Unions

    April 1, 2019
    National labor policy guarantees employees the right to form a union to promote their interests. There are clear, longstanding rules and procedures that provide a direct path to unionization. But what happens when workers decide they no longer desire union representation? For the majority of private-sector workers, there are also clear, formal rules on how to remove an unwanted union.
  • Union Subsidy Faces Judicial Scrutiny

    March 28, 2019
    “When you’re hired as a teacher, you should be teaching,” said Judge Jose L. Fuentes of the New Jersey Court of Appeals. This statement is commonsense and uncontroversial. Unfortunately, commonsense is in short supply across the United States. A vast majority of states allow teachers, and other state and local employees, to perform union business instead of the job they were hired to do.
  • Why National Right to Work Act Is Necessary

    March 19, 2019
    No worker should be compelled to join or pay dues or fees to a union just to get or keep a job. The U.S. Supreme Court reinforced this principle in Janus v. AFSCME, where the justices ruled that state and local public employees cannot be forced to financially assist a union as a condition of employment. “Forcing free and independent individuals to endorse ideas they find objectionable is always demeaning,” Justice Samuel Alito wrote in the majority opinion in Janus.

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