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  • New Study: The Case against Antitrust Law

    April 17, 2019
    Antitrust regulation is a complex, multifaceted issue. It brings together insights from law, economics, political science, history, philosophy, and other disciplines. Right now both political parties are ramping up their antitrust rhetoric, and it will likely be a live issue throughout the 2020 election cycle. A working understanding of how antitrust regulation works is important for understanding why it works so poorly, and should ultimately be abolished.
  • Shed Light on Cryptocurrency 'Dark Matter' Regulation at SEC

    April 16, 2019
    A few days ago, the Trump administration issued a memorandum strongly discouraging what the Competitive Enterprise Institute’s Wayne Crews has called “regulatory dark matter.” The memo instructs federal agencies to submit all policymaking rules to Congress to be vetted under the Congressional Review Act, even if these rules come in the form of informal “guidance.”
  • Carbon Tax Not a Conservative Policy

    April 16, 2019
    Yesterday’s E&E News ran an article titled “Inside conservatives’ disarray on climate.” E&E reporter Mark Matthews was inspired to write the piece by an email from Alliance for Market Solutions executive director Alex Flint. Flint’s thesis: “Anyone who denies the risk of climate change is irresponsible. And being irresponsible disqualifies anyone from being a true conservative.”
  • FDA Created the Youth Vaping Epidemic, Now It’s Doubling Down

    April 15, 2019
    E-cigarettes pose less risk than smoking. The science is clear: while cigarettes kill about half their users, e-cigarettes have perhaps five percent of the risk. Therefore, e-cigarettes have the ability to save the lives of those smokers who switch to vaping. Yet, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is trying to eradicate e-cigarettes, a move that would sacrifice smoker lives and squander one of the greatest public health opportunities of our generation.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    April 15, 2019
    In a remarkable human achievement, scientists took the first-ever image of a black hole. The effort took eight telescopes on five continents, five petabytes of data, and an algorithm designed by a team led by MIT grad student Katie Bouman. On a smaller scale, a forthcoming executive order could help rein in “​​​​​​​regulatory dark matter,” a cosmological term CEI’s Wayne Crews borrowed to describe regulations that “require compliance without ever having been subject to a period of public comment and review.”
  • Restrictions on Debt Collection Impede Access to Credit

    April 12, 2019
    In a market economy that is based on private property and the rule of law, the efficient and effective enforcement of contracts is indispensable. Without the ability to enforce the promises made between individuals and businesses, any form of transaction, especially credit products, would be harder and more expensive, if not impossible.
  • Administration Takes on Anti-Infrastructure Misuse of Clean Water Act

    April 12, 2019
    President Donald J. Trump issued an executive order on April 10th that is intended to limit the misuse of the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) by governors in several states to stop fossil fuel infrastructure projects, particularly pipelines.
  • Proposed Climate Science Review Continues to Attract Support and Opposition

    April 12, 2019
    The proposal by Dr. William Happer of the White House’s National Security Council staff to create an independent panel of experts to do a critical review of official climate science reports continues to attract supporters and opponents.  The CO2 Coalition on April 8th sent a letter to President Trump supporting the independent review.
  • Support Builds for EPA to Reconsider Endangerment Finding

    April 12, 2019
    In the 2007 case Massachusetts v. EPA, the Supreme Court held that Environmental Protection Agency had the power to regulate carbon dioxide as a pollutant under the Clean Air Act, which requires the agency to regulate pollutants from new vehicles when they “cause, or contribute to, air pollution which may reasonably be anticipated to endanger public health or welfare.” The court went on to rule that the EPA had failed to adequately explain its decision not to regulate carbon dioxide in this manner.
  • Americans Optimistic about Role of Tech and Platforms

    April 12, 2019
    At a time when big tech companies are being attacked over bigness, privacy, elections, and the ordering of their news feeds, the Charles Koch Institute has some good news. While we all have plenty of complaints, Americans also have a lot of good things to say about the platforms, websites, and apps that they use every day.

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