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  • Labor Relations Chief Corrects Record on 'Joint Employer' Rule

    October 8, 2019
    Chairman John Ring delivered the latest salvo in response to the manufactured “scandal” at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). Democrats, with help from the NLRB inspector general, have improperly accused members of the board of bogus conflicts of interest that have impeded the policymaking ability of the agency. These attacks are political, and have no factual basis.
  • Costs of Economic Distortions Caused by 'Ordinary' Federal Spending, Subsidies, and Stimulus

    October 7, 2019
    While routine ground-level federal spending is less glamorous than interventionist national agendas, socialization of properties and resources, or economic “stimulus” and “big science” crusades, the distortions and displacement caused by ordinary government spending are nonetheless highly significant.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    October 7, 2019
    Non-impeachment news involved a major court ruling on net neutrality, plus a new tariff. This year’s Federal Register is on pace to surpass last year’s after a nearly 2,000-page week. Rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from modern swine slaughter to order forms for illegal drugs.
  • Industry and Nonprofit Groups Urge Senate Support for 'Clean' Energy and Climate Bills

    October 5, 2019
    A number of industry trade associations plus some non-profit groups sent a letter to Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Minority Leader Chuck Schumer on October 3rd urging them to bring a list of “clean” energy and climate-related bills to the floor this fall.
  • New $7.5 Billion Tariffs against European Union

    October 3, 2019
    The Trump administration has announced tariffs on $7.5 billion of goods from the European Union. This time, it is being done with the World Trade Organization’s blessing. Here is what is different about these tariffs—and what isn’t.
  • Costs of Government Steering by Direct Ownership or Control of Resources

    October 3, 2019
    If one thinks government ought to run a sector of the economy (single-payer health care, education, retirement, energy), then almost by definition that individual would not be inclined toward acknowledging regulatory costs of lesser interventions. The benefits will always exceed the costs in that mindset.
  • Vast Regulatory Costs of Top-Down National Plans, Agendas, and Legislative Schemes

    October 2, 2019
    If government steers in some societal, industrial, or sector-specific endeavor via top-down national plans, agendas, or legislative schemes, it can generate ongoing regulatory costs even without further legislation and rules. Not infrequently, extraordinarily consequential policy choices can eclipse the handful of official regulatory cost estimates that policymakers typically regard as illustrative of government intervention.
  • Priorities for Department of Labor's New Secretary

    October 2, 2019
    On September 30th, Eugene Scalia was sworn in as the 28th Secretary of Labor. Last week, the Senate confirmed Scalia on a 53-44 vote. With about 15 months left in President Trump’s term, here are few actions the Labor Department can take to increase union financial transparency, cut down on federal construction costs, and study the impact of wage and hour laws.
  • New Study: Minimum Wages Have Tradeoffs

    October 2, 2019
    Congress nearly increased the federal minimum wage from $7.25 to $15 per hour this year. Though the Raise the Wage Act is unlikely to pass the Senate, 29 states and numerous local governments have passed their own increases. Moreover, the next session of Congress will almost certainly reintroduce the bill. This issue will be alive for a long time to come. Though some workers would benefit from a higher minimum wage, this would only be at other workers’ expense. As I argue in a new paper, minimum wages have tradeoffs.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    September 30, 2019
    Congress is out of session for the next two weeks, and the impeachment investigation will likely dominate headlines for some time to come. Meanwhile, the 2019 Federal Register topped 50,000 pages and rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from toll-free numbers to voluntary rabbit grading.

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