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  • Minimum Wages Rise Across the Country

    January 13, 2020
    Twenty four states rang in 2020 with minimum wage increases. Most of the increases are modest, so the tradeoffs will be, too. But there was curiously little discussion of those tradeoffs. The more than 50 increases that have just taken effect are all at the state and local level, but minimum wages will almost certainly be a significant campaign issue in 2020. Regardless of November’s election results, next year’s incoming Congress will likely attempt another increase next year.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    January 13, 2020
    The new year started off with a literal bang, though as of this writing the worst Iran scenario seems to have been avoided. The Senate is poised to move on its two biggest items, impeachment and the USMCA trade agreement, though the timelines for both are uncertain. On the regulatory front, the 2020 Federal Register took just five working days to exceed 1,000 pages. New final regulations for the week range from air compressors to beef promotion.
  • EIA Projects Renewables Will be “Most Used” Energy Source in 2050—but …

    January 13, 2020
    “With the rapid growth of electricity generation, renewables—including solar, wind, and hydroelectric power—are the fastest-growing energy source between 2018 and 2050, surpassing petroleum and other liquids to become the most used energy source in the Reference case,” the U.S. Energy Information Administration concludes in its newly released International Energy Outlook 2019. So, does that mean the world is rapidly phasing out fossil fuels? No.
  • Trump Administration Rewrites the Rules for the National Environmental Policy Act

    January 13, 2020
    President Trump on January 9 rolled out new rules to implement the National Environmental Policy Act of 1970 (NEPA). NEPA was enacted in 1970, and the current implementing rules were adopted in 1978. Since then, NEPA has become the preferred method for delaying major infrastructure and natural resource projects to death, both in the time it takes to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and the time it takes to dispose of multiple lawsuits.
  • Brexit Update: Nigel Ashford and Iain Murray Offer Analysis

    January 10, 2020
    With the vote yesterday in the House of Commons to approve Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s plan for separating the United Kingdom from the European Union, it seems that after a very long road, Brexit will actually happen on January 31.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    January 6, 2020
    Happy New Year, everyone. We’re doing a slightly different format this week, on account of the new year starting mid-week. With just two days’ worth of data so far, year-to-date totals and annual projections for 2020 are not yet very informative.
  • Proposed iHeart Media Acquisition Threatened by Antitrust Regulation

    January 3, 2020
    The Wall Street Journal recently reported that Liberty Media Corp, which already owns Sirius XM satellite radio, including its Pandora streaming service, and 33% of concert promotion giant Live Nation Entertainment, wants permission from the US Department of Justice to purchase a controlling stake in iHeart Media Inc. 
  • Mitt Romney Made Millions off Cigarettes, Now He Wants to Kill its Competition

    January 2, 2020
    Though they (probably) aren’t car surfing or eating Tide pods,  lawmakers and government bureaucrats are as susceptible to passing fads as bored teenagers. For government folks, efforts to prevent death and disease from smoking is so last century. Cigarettes are “out,” e-cigarettes are “in.”
  • Best Books of 2019: Year of Vindication for Mother of George Washington

    December 31, 2019
    August 25 of this past year was the 230th anniversary of the death of Mary Ball Washington, the mother of the first president of the United States. Her life was extraordinary, as she lived into her 80s, seeing her son George lead the Continental Army to victory against Great Britain in the Revolutionary War and then become the nation’s first President in 1789.
  • How Much Federal Regulation Was There in 2019?

    December 31, 2019
    Happy New Year, everyone. Now that 2019 is in the books, we have some data on how much new regulation hit the books. Note that these numbers are preliminary and might change. The source for most of the numbers is Federal Register.gov. The page numbers counts are taken from the Federal Register’s daily digest email. Wayne Crews’ Ten Thousand Commandments also has abundant data.

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