You are here

OpenMarket

  • Federal Court Rightly Affirms Online Platforms' First Amendment Rights

    February 28, 2020
    This week the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled that, “despite YouTube’s ubiquity and its role as a publicfacing platform, it remains a private forum, not a public forum subject to judicial scrutiny under the First Amendment.” CEI agrees with the court and has said as much – many times.
  • Two Cheers for Nikki Haley's Defense of Capitalism

    February 27, 2020
    Former U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley has written a bold and, for the most part, very good op-ed on the future of capitalism for The Wall Street Journal.
  • The Minimum Wage Tax Increase

    February 27, 2020
    By far the most common criticism of minimum wages is that they cost jobs.
  • Net Reality: Five Years Since the Open Internet Order

    February 26, 2020
    If you’re reading this, the Internet is alive and well. If you’re wondering how the Internet is doing, just picture a rocket—symbolizing both the incredible Internet speeds and new technological frontiers achievable through deregulation.
  • "Scientocracy" Highlights Problematic Incentives in Government Research

    February 25, 2020
    Yesterday CEI put on an excellent event on science policy on Capitol Hill on the new book Scientocracy: The Tangled Web of Public Science and Public Policy. The quick take is that government-funded and government-endorsed science is subject to at least as many problematic and confounding issues as any research funded by a profit-seeking corporation. The argument is not that science isn’t important enough for the government to become involved, it’s that it is too important to let the perverse incentives of political control hold it back.
  • Chairman Crapo Offers Hope for Safe Banking in Controversial Industries

    February 25, 2020
    Last October, the House passed the Secure and Fair Enforcement (SAFE) Banking Act to provide safe harbor for banks and credit unions doing business with legal cannabis businesses. Following its passage, Senate Banking Committee Chairman Mike Crapo issued a recommendation to merge language from the Financial Institution Consumer Protection Act—a proposed measure that would prevent regulators from ordering depository institutions to terminate the accounts of legal businesses they disapprove of—into the SAFE Banking Act. This would resolve a threat posed to businesses seen as “high risk” by agency bureaucrats.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations

    February 24, 2020
    During the four-day week, Lawrence Tesler passed away. The underappreciated inventor created the cut, copy, and paste functions on computers. The Hair Club for Men also lost a client. Meanwhile, agencies issued new final regulations ranging from “biological products” to land erosion taxes.
  • New Analysis on Tax and Regulatory Issues for Carsharing Companies

    February 21, 2020
    Our friend and Tech Policy Podcast host Ash Kazaryan recently recorded a fascinating interview with Reason Foundation Policy Analyst Spence Purnell on how Florida (and some other states) are regulating platform economy firms, in particular carsharing services like Turo.
  • Sustainability Disclosures, Meant to Protect, Could Create Additional Risk for Investors

    February 21, 2020
    The Sustainability Accounting Standards Board (SASB) claims that it focuses on issues that are “financially material” to the companies they are assessing. But materiality is in the eye of the beholder. Critics of the SASB would say that very few, if any, investors actually care about many of the detailed sustainability topics that companies are supposed to provide disclosures on. Instead, many of the topics line up better with the agendas of left-wing advocacy groups who are hostile to market economies in general.
  • U.S. Department of Transportation Proposes Modernizing its Aviation Consumer Protection Authority

    February 21, 2020
    Secretary of Transportation Elaine Chao announced a new proposed rule that would “align its definitions of unfairness and deception with the principles set forth by the Federal Trade Commission,” which “is intended to provide regulated entities and other interested parties greater clarity and certainty about the Department’s interpretation of unfair or deceptive practices in the context of aviation consumer protection rulemaking and enforcement actions.” This is great news for consumers and their aviation service providers.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket