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Center for Energy and Environment

<p><strong>Center Director: <a href="http://cei.org/expert/myron-ebell">Myron Ebell</a></strong></p><p>CEI’s Center for Energy and Environment makes the positive case for abundant energy and promotes environmental policies based on economic freedom, property rights, and limited government.&nbsp; We oppose policies based on the beliefs that prosperity threatens the environment, that the answer to every environmental challenge is more regulation, and that risks can be abolished by limiting human ingenuity.</p>

CPAC Panel: How I Learned to Stop Worrying & Love Plastic Water Bottles, Fracking, Genetically Modified Food, & Big Gulp Sodas

Location: 
Gaylord National: Potomac Ballroom
201 Waterfront St
National Harbor, MD 20745
United States
Event Date: 
Teaser: 

CPAC discussion of anti-consumer, nanny-state regulation, featuring CEI's Angela Logomasini, Senior Fellow, Center for Energy & Environment.

Julie Gunlock, Director, Women for Food Freedom Project, Independent Women’s Forum
Angela Logomasini, Senior Fellow, Competitive Enterprise Institute
Jillian Kay Melchior, Thomas L. Rhodes Fellow, Franklin Center for Government
Jeff Stier, Senior Fellow, National Center for Public Policy Research
Moderator: Sabrina Schaeffer, Executive Director, Independent Women’s Forum

CPAC panel: Re-Energizing America

Location: 
Gaylord National: Chesapeake D-F
201 Waterfront St
National Harbor, MD 20745
United States
Subtitle: 
Re-Energizing the American Dream
Event Date: 
Teaser: 

CPAC discussion of energy policy and politics featuring Myron Ebell, Director of CEI's Center on Energy & Environment.

The Honorable Shelley Moore Capito, U.S. Representative (WV-2)
Myron Ebell, Director of Energy and Global Warming Policy, Competitive Enterprise Institute
The Honorable James Inhofe, U.S. Senator (R-OK)
Peter Ferrara, Senior Fellow, Entitlement & Budget Policy, The Heartland Institute
Moderator: Steve Moore, Editorial Board Member, Wall Street Journal

10 Cool Global Warming Policies

Full Document Available in PDF

Global warming is a reality. But whether it is a serious problem — and whether emis-sions of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases from human fossil fuel useare the principal cause — are uncertain. The current debate over the U. S. responseto climate change centers on greenhouse gas emissions reduction policies, which arelikely to impose substantially higher costs to society than global warming might.

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