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Climate Science Destroyed, Online Drug Advertising and Opposing Net Neutrality

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Climate Science Destroyed, Online Drug Advertising and Opposing Net Neutrality

A government-funded research center destroys the original data behind its predictions of global warming.

The Food and Drug Administrations seeks input about online advertising of drugs and other medical products.

House Republican leaders take issue with the Federal Communications Commission’s plan to implement net neutrality regulations.

Listen to LibertyWeek, the CEI podcast, here.

1. SCIENCE

A government-funded research center destroys the original data behind its predictions of global warming.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: General Counsel Sam Kazman on  why the EPA should now reconsider its findings on climate change:

“The Environmental Protection Agency is resting its case on international studies that in turn relied on Climate Research Unit (CRU) data.  But CRU’s suspicious destruction of its original data, disclosed at this late date, makes that information totally unreliable.  If EPA doesn’t reexamine the implications of this, it’s stumbling blindly into the most important regulatory issue we face.”

 

2. HEALTH

The Food and Drug Administrations seeks input about online advertising of drugs and other medical products.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Senior Fellow Gregory Conko on why the FDA needs to join the 21st century:

“For over a decade, the FDA has treated the Internet as just another form of print advertising. Internet ads have had to comply with rules that simply don’t make sense in the Internet Age, where the amount of text available in a banner ad or sponsored link is strictly limited, but the required information can be ‘one click’ away on the landing page to which those ads direct the user.”

 

3. TECHNOLOGY

House Republican leaders take issue with the Federal Communications Commission’s plan to implement net neutrality regulations.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Journalism Fellow Ryan Young on the conflicts created by such rules:

“Net neutrality proposals are driving a wedge between service providers like AT&T and content providers like Google. Strange, is it not? Their interests are actually closely aligned. If AT&T upgrades its network, Google benefits from the increased bandwidth. If Google improves its products, AT&T benefits from increased demand for broadband. Net neutrality proposals give companies the incentive to seek rents at each other’s expense when they could be benefitting from each other’s innovations instead. This must be music to the ears of lobbyists, but how sad for consumers.”

 

Listen to LibertyWeek, the CEI podcast, here.