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Economic Projections, Comcast Sues the FCC and Cholesterol Drugs

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Economic Projections, Comcast Sues the FCC and Cholesterol Drugs

A new report from the Federal Reserve projects continued slow growth and a weak business climate.

Comcast sues the Federal Communications Commission over interference in its network management practices.

Researchers debate the possible cancer risks of anti-cholesterol drug Vytorin.

 

1. BUSINESS

A new report from the Federal Reserve projects continued slow growth and a weak business climate.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Special Projects Counsel Hans BaderFed’s own policies have helped bring us to this point: on how the

“Inflation is now a bigger economic problem than unemployment, argues the Wall Street Journal, and is a bigger concern to voters, too.  The Fed has been inflating the currency to try to prop up the economy and bail out overextended borrowers, but its policy has backfired.  The resulting devaluation of the dollar has impoverished Americans, and triggered a flight of capital from the U.S. as well, cutting investment in our economy.  Mortgage bailout legislation also poses a threat to the economy and to taxpayers.”

 

2. TECHNOLOGY

Comcast sues the Federal Communications Commission over interference in its network management practices.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Technology Policy Analyst Cord Blomquist cites one expert who is questioning the FCC’s authority in the Comcast case:

“William Kennard, Obama for President Telecommunications Adviser, describes the FCC’s jurisdiction in the Comcast case as “murky”…Kennard went on to say that enshrining net neutrality into law would be necessary to clear up this authority issue. This is a guy who knows what he’s talking about. As a former chairman and general counsel for the FCC, he knows just as well as anyone else where the commission’s authority begins and ends.”

 

3. HEALTH

Researchers debate the possible cancer risks of anti-cholesterol drug Vytorin.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Adjunct Analyst Steven Milloy on what the most recent test results have shown:

“[Oxford University epidemiologist Richard] Peto found no increase in risk of cancer over time in the three trials – generally, cancer risk increases with increasing exposure to a cancer-causing substance. This observation, he acknowledged, will also require more follow-up, since the patients in the trials have been followed for only a few years.”

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