You are here

Europe Investigates Intel, Obama Explodes the Deficit and Minnesota Jumps on the Banned Wagon

Daily Update

Title

Europe Investigates Intel, Obama Explodes the Deficit and Minnesota Jumps on the Banned Wagon

European antitrust officials prepare to rule in an investigation of Intel’s microchip marketing practices.

The White House estimates that the deficit will explode to $1.8 trillion this year.

Minnesota bans baby bottles made with the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA).

For more news, listen to the LibertyWeek podcast here

1. TECHNOLOGY 

European antitrust officials prepare to rule in an investigation of Intel’s microchip marketing practices.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews on Europe’s misguided approach to technology policy: 

“It’s a familiar story; subjecting Europe's technology sector to political predation via aggressive antitrust regulation and involuntary licensing is less about protecting consumers than about competitors' regarding themselves as entitled to someone else’s customers. Antitrust regulation protects politically connected competitors, not mom-and- pop operations, and certainly not the competitive process.” 

 

2. BUSINESS

The White House estimates that the deficit will explode to $1.8 trillion this year.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Special Projects Counsel Hans Bader on the mirage of new jobs

“Even in the short run, the stimulus will create few jobs. The White House now admits that there will be no job growth until 2010. It’s not surprising, since the stimulus package subsidizes sectors where unemployment is low — like education, health care, and state government — and not sectors where it is high, like construction, transportation, and production jobs.” 

 

3. HEALTH

Minnesota bans baby bottles made with the chemical Bisphenol A (BPA).

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Director of Risk and Environmental Policy Angela Logomasini on the health and safety advantages of using BPA: 

“BPA is a very valuable product for making all sorts of products and packaging—providing many public health and other benefits. It makes break-proof containers (such as for baby bottles) and sanitary packaging that keeps our food from becoming exposed to truly dangerous pathogens. For example, it lines many beverage cans and food containers to prevent metals from entering the food and to reduce the potential for bacterial development.” 

 

Listen to LibertyWeek, the CEI podcast, here.