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Fed Chairman in Trouble, Kids' TV Goes Green and Google Goes Edge-Caching

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Fed Chairman in Trouble, Kids' TV Goes Green and Google Goes Edge-Caching

Critics of the financial bailout allege that the federal government has exceeded its Constitutional powers.

The Nickelodeon TV network for kids begins an environmental awareness campaign called The Big Green Help.

Google fields criticism for attempting to speed up download times with the practice of “edge-caching”.

More headlines: listen to the LibertyWeek podcast.

1. BUSINESS 

Critics of the financial bailout allege that the federal government has exceeded its Constitutional powers.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Special Projects Counsel Hans Bader on why the Federal Reserve chairman should be held responsible

“The Fed’s increasingly radical bailout measures have been described by sympathetic journalists as ‘creative.’ That polite euphemism disguises the fact that many of the Fed’s bailout measures have been illegal and lacking in any statutory authorization. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke should be removed from office for usurping powers not granted to the Fed by any federal law.” 

 

2. ENVIRONMENT

The Nickelodeon TV network for kids begins an environmental awareness campaign called The Big Green Help

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Senior Fellow Iain Murray on how the campaign is surprisingly balanced

“…when you look at the list of ‘the four elements of the big green help,’ it’s less objectionable than the initial impression would suggest. Of the four elements, only one is really bad, including as it does the pernicious ideas that recycling toilet paper is a good thing and that tap water is better than bottled water. There’s also the confused idea that local/organic food might be better than ‘normal’ food. The rest of it, however, is completely compatible with a no-regrets approach to global warming.” 

 

3. TECHNOLOGY

Google fields criticism for attempting to speed up download times with the practice of “edge-caching”.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Information Policy Analyst Ryan Radia on what Google is trying to accomplish

“We’ve heard about how edge-caching enables content providers and ISPs to cut their bandwidth bills and make more efficient use of finite network resources. Both of these are true, but there’s more—edge caching makes it much less likely that users will experience long load times or buffering hiccups while watching streaming video online. That high-def YouTube clip might take a few extra seconds to buffer if it has to make its way through congested central network exchanges—not so, however, if that video is housed just a few hops away, within your ISP’s network.” 

 

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