You are here

The Fed, Homeschooling, and Sport Gambling

Daily Update

Title

The Fed, Homeschooling, and Sport Gambling

After many congressional attempts to limit the power of the Federal Reserve, some senators are now moving to give more power to the Fed.

A German couple was harassed and threatened with fines after attempting to homeschool their children.

A Democratic senator in New Jersey is challenging the legality of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, which bans sports gambling.

1. CONGRESS

After many congressional attempts to limit the power of the Federal Reserve, some senators are now moving to give more power to the Fed.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Vice President for Policy Wayne Crews on the separation of powers and the role of the executive branch.

“We’ve argued often that a nation’s prosperity requires something apart from an expanded state, collectivism new government spending, yet more stimulus to nowhere, and today’s incarnation, the use of greater executive power. Restoring economic growth and healthy bounds on government only requires assurances that Uncle Sam will keep his hands in his own pockets and reject the model of government steering while the market is forced to row toward crosswind, collectivist, selfish political goals.”

 

2. REGULATION

A German couple was harassed and threatened with fines after attempting to homeschool their children.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Warren Brookes Fellow Ryan Young on Germany’s homeschooling ban.

“American parents don’t have much in the way of educational choice. But it does appear they do have more than German parents do. Immigration and Customs Enforcement should stand up for the Romeikes’ rights.”

 

3. LEGAL

A Democratic senator in New Jersey is challenging the legality of the Professional and Amateur Sports Protection Act, which bans sports gambling.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Policy Analyst Michelle Minton on the senator’s case.

“As usual, Lesniak makes the case that legalized sports gambling will bring in sorely needed tax money. While this argument misses the point, and a state regulatory authority has as little right as the feds to ban individuals from engaging in the free act of gambling with their own money, it does move the US a step in the right direction. It would also pave the way for legalized state-regulated internet gambling."