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Gun Rights, the Fairness Doctrine and Internet Gambling

Daily Update

Title

Gun Rights, the Fairness Doctrine and Internet Gambling

The Supreme Court strikes down the Washington, D.C. ban on handgun ownership.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces support for the “Fairness Doctrine” in broadcast regulation.

Congress prepares to consider revisions to the federal law banning Internet gambling.

1. LEGAL

The Supreme Court strikes down the Washington, D.C. ban on handgun ownership.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Special Projects Counsel Hans Bader on what the city’s own constitution says about gun ownership:

“The District of Columbia is currently defending Washington, D.C.’s gun ban before the Supreme Court in District of ColumbiaIt argues that the Second Amendment merely protects state and local governments’ collective right to arm a militia against federal interference, not an individual right to bear arms. But it turns out that the District of Columbia’s own ‘constitution’ contains a provision in its Bill of Rights identical to the Second Amendment in its language, providing that ‘A well regulated militia being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed.’” v. Heller.

 

2. POLITICS

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announces support for the “Fairness Doctrine” in broadcast regulation.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Technology Policy Analyst Cord Blomquist on what’s at stake in the debate:

“The doctrine, abandoned in 1985, placed political speech by broadcasters under the scrutiny of the Federal Communications Commission. FCC regulators mandated broadcasters ‘make reasonable judgments in good faith’ on how best to present all sides of controversial issues. Conservatives on Capitol Hill have banded together to oppose such a revival of the doctrine while pundits and free speech advocates have railed against the reinstatement of rule, citing the 1985 Supreme Court decision that found that the Fairness Doctrine had a ‘chilling effect’ on speech.”

 

3. FINANCE

Congress prepares to consider revisions to the federal law banning Internet gambling.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Senior Fellow Eli Lehrer and Policy Analyst Michelle Minton on some of the problems with the current law:

“Banks, credit card companies, and credit unions will have to expend significant resources to comply with the proposed regulations since they introduce a new reason to monitor every transaction. Given the direct payment-billing relationship that all of them have with their customers, it is highly likely that any costs incurred as a result of the law will hit consumers’ wallets directly. Savings account interest rates will go down while mortgage rates and credit card fees will go up.”