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Home Sales Rise, Voter Fraud Accusations and Another Ban on Bottled Water

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Home Sales Rise, Voter Fraud Accusations and Another Ban on Bottled Water

Existing home sales rise 5.5% in September.

Groups around the country preemptively prepare for the possibility of voter fraud. 

Bottled water faces a ban by city government in Providence, R.I.

 

More headlines: listen to the LibertyWeek podcast.

1. BUSINESS

Existing home sales rise 5.5% in September.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Adjunct Analyst Fran Smith reacts to the news:

“The National Association of Realtors, which released the data, said the gains are fairly widespread. The NAR credits low home prices and low interest rates for the gains. In another encouraging sign, total housing inventories were down for the second month in a row. Is our government with its proposed stimulus package still going to ‘stimulate’ greater credit availability for home buying?  The people currently buying are more likely to pass their credit screening and affordability indexes — hopefully, lenders are using those now.”

 

2. LEGAL

Groups around the country preemptively prepare for the possibility of voter fraud.  

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Special Projects Counsel Hans Baderright in Washington, D.C.’s backyard: on allegations of voter fraud

“In Virginia’s liberal Fairfax County, officials are illegally discarding absentee ballots cast by members of the military based on a technical requirement that is preempted by federal law.  Meanwhile, people who live out-of-state are being allowed to vote (some people have boasted of being registered to vote, and voting, both in Virginia and another state) in Virginia elections, contrary to state law, based on instructions from liberal state voting officials and false claims by liberal advocacy groups.”

 

3. ENVIRONMENT

Bottled water faces a ban by city government in Providence, R.I.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Director of Risk & Environmental Policy Angela Logomasini on the difference between bottled water and the stuff from the tap:

“…the reason that bottled water tastes so different than tap is because it is different — despite green claims that some bottled water is nothing more than repackaged tap water. While some bottled water may share the same source as city water, bottled water companies further purify municipal water before bottling. In fact, the two leading brands — Aquafina and Dasani — both use reverse osmosis to filter out impurities. Such advanced purification technology does cost a bit more, but some people think it produces tastier water than what they get municipal water treatment plants. Other special treatments used for bottled water include distillation and ozonation, all of which are performed on top of municipal filtration.”

 

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