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Stem Cells, Regulating Lawn Mowers and Standing up to the SEC

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Stem Cells, Regulating Lawn Mowers and Standing up to the SEC

The National Academy of Sciences argues for continued use of embryonic stem cells.

The Environmental Protection Agency requires that new gas-powered lawn mowers come with catalytic converters. 

A federal Appeals Court rules on the legality of the federal government’s corporate accounting regulations.

More healines: listen to the CEI Weekly Podcast.

1. SCIENCE

The National Academy of Sciences argues for continued use of embryonic stem cells.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Adjunct Fellow Sigrid Fry-Revere on debate over funding of stem cell research:

“This is not a question of whether the research should be conducted, but whether public funding for it is justified. It is impossible to know how successful this research will be or whether any individual projects will produce genuine medical treatments, and it is not the place of government to gamble with taxpayers’ money.”

 

2. ENVIRONMENT

The Environmental Protection Agency requires that new gas-powered lawn mowers come with catalytic converters.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Director of Energy Policy Myron Ebell on what the EPA used to think about the effects of the catalytic converter:

“The catalytic converter is no longer an environmental savior, according to the New York Times [May 29, 1998]. Though the device sharply reduced smog emissions from autos, it may be out of favor at the Environmental Protection Agency. A new EPA study says that the converters break down the compounds of nitrogen and oxygen that then combine with hydrocarbons to form nitrous oxide, a greenhouse gas 300 times more potent than carbon dioxide.”

 

3. LEGAL

A federal Appeals Court rules on the legality of the federal government’s corporate accounting regulations.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Center for Entrepreneurship Director John Berlau on the future impact of the ruling:

“Although the court this round ruled against the merits of Beckstead’s case — that the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board’s appointment by the Securities and Exchange commission violates the Constitution’s appointment clause — this ruling on standing by itself is very important. It means that small entrepreneurs in the future will have more recourse against overweening government agencies on shaky constitutional foundations. All Americans owe [plaintiff Brad] Beckstead and his legal team a debt of gratitude for this victory on behalf of their liberties.”

 

Listen to the CEI Weekly Podcast here.