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OpenMarket: Richard Morrison

  • VIDEO: How Does the Trade War Hurt You?

    October 18, 2019
    Our friends over at the Cato Institute are known for their excellent free-market analysis, in particular on hot button issues like trade. They recently released a great short video to drive home the actual incidence of bad policy: “How Does the Trade War Hurt You?”
  • More Shields and Fewer Swords in Realm of Federal Regulation

    October 11, 2019
    Yesterday the New Civil Liberties Alliance (NCLA) held a fascinating event on one of their marquee cases, Baldwin v. United States (read more in my post from last month—it’s the second of the four cases discussed). The case involves the Internal Revenue Service issuing a tax filing rule that conflicted both with legislation passed by Congress and with centuries-old common law practice.
  • Software Solutions for Regulatory Reform?

    October 8, 2019
    On Friday, the C. Boyden Gray Center for the Study of the Administrative State held a fascinating conference, “The Administration of Democracy,” which covered issues like campaign finance law, apportionment, and the president’s tax returns. The fourth panel of the day, “The Democracy of Administration,” featured a discussion of the public comment process on proposed regulations, now accessed by most people via the web portal regulations.gov.
  • VIDEO: Life Is Getting Better

    September 27, 2019
    Despite prominent headlines to the contrary, the world is not actually falling apart. As our friends at places like Human Progress tirelessly work to remind us, global trends on everything from war and famine to longevity and literacy are looking good.
  • New Civil Liberties Alliance Fighting for Constitutional Limits on Government Power

    September 26, 2019
    Thanks to the New Civil Liberties Alliance for hosting a great event this week, during which their staff attorneys recounted the status of some of the biggest cases in which they’re currently involved. By a happy coincidence, the legal advocacy group is also celebrating its second birthday this month. See the summaries and links below for information on four important and timely cases that could re-draw the boundaries of federal authority in the United States.
  • VIDEO: Prosperity Is More Than Wages

    September 20, 2019
    In a new video for the PolicyEd channel, economist Russ Roberts takes on the popular—though misleading—narrative that ordinary working Americans haven’t made any real economic progress in the last generation or so.
  • Policy Circle 4th Annual Leadership Summit Coming to Chicago

    September 12, 2019
    There are a lot of useful conferences, meetings, and conventions that fill our calendars, and one that we're especially looking forward to this year is the Policy Circle’s 4th Annual Leadership Summit in Chicago. The Policy Circle is a non-profit organization committed to advancing women’s leadership through expanding knowledge of public policy, and they've got some excellent speakers lined up.
  • Welfare for Billionaires: Stadium Subsidies Are Pure Cronyism

    September 6, 2019
    Our old friend (and former Competitive Enterprise Institute journalism fellow) Tim Carney is doing excellent work at the American Enterprise Institute these days, where he is shining a light on the huge costs and breathtaking unfairness of corrupt government handouts to private parties—what we call cronyism.
  • When Did Conservatives Stop Loving a Free Economy?

    August 22, 2019
    National Review contributor and rage-inducing controversialist Kevin Williamson has a new book out, “The Smallest Minority: Independent Thinking in the Age of Mob Politics,” which covers a lot of big-picture theory on democracy, social psychology, and even theology. For the moment, I’m most interested in what he says about capitalism’s history and its recent evolution (if I may use that biological term).
  • Business Roundtable Restates Obvious: Stakeholders Matter (and Always Have)

    August 19, 2019
    There’s a flurry of news coverage this morning about the Business Roundtable releasing a new public statement on “the purpose of a corporation.” Whereas previous versions stated that “corporations exist principally to serve their shareholders,” the new statement emphasizes the way in which the signatory CEOs “create value for all our stakeholders, whose long-term interests are inseparable.” Opinion writers like the Washington Post’s Steven Pearlstein consider this shift in language “significant,” but it seems more a clarification of what has always been true for American businesses than any real change in direction.

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