You are here

OpenMarket

  • David Koch (1940-2019), R.I.P.

    August 23, 2019
    Friend, philanthropist, inventor, and industrialist David Koch has died at the age of 79.  He was a father and husband. Known best for his pro-liberty activism and involvement in national politics, he also improved countless lives with more than a billion dollars in philanthropic donations to artistic, cultural, and medical charities. His generosity, optimism, and commitment to a freer world will continue to bear fruit for many generations.
  • Heretics in the Church of Tobacco Control

    August 23, 2019
    ​​​​​​​H.P. Lovecraft opined in 1931 that “if religion were true its followers would not try to bludgeon their young into artificial conformity, but would merely insist on their unbending quest for truth ….” Of all the professions in the world, one might think scientists would be most inclined to agree with this sentiment. But, as the case of Dr. Marewa Glover demonstrates, anti-tobacco research has become more religion than science, where anyone who dares to deviate from or even question the prevailing dogma is cast out as a heretic.
  • When Did Conservatives Stop Loving a Free Economy?

    August 22, 2019
    National Review contributor and rage-inducing controversialist Kevin Williamson has a new book out, “The Smallest Minority: Independent Thinking in the Age of Mob Politics,” which covers a lot of big-picture theory on democracy, social psychology, and even theology. For the moment, I’m most interested in what he says about capitalism’s history and its recent evolution (if I may use that biological term).
  • Sealand, from Pirate Radio to Seasteading

    August 21, 2019
    Setting up a sovereign free territory has long been a dream of libertarian mavericks, from the ill-fated Republic of Minerva to the nascent Free Republic of Liberland. Yet arguably none has achieved the longevity of the Principality of Sealand. A major reason for that longevity—and accompanying notoriety—is the fact that Sealand, while perhaps whimsical in its origin, wasn’t merely a utopian experiment.
  • Will T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Increase Prices?

    August 21, 2019
    Lots of things influence prices and, of course, not all are influenced by the same factors. However, the lawsuit filed by several state attorneys general against T-Mobile/Sprint merger explicitly links the number of competitors in wireless market places to lower prices in several places.
  • Antitrust Basics: Corruption and Rent-Seeking

    August 21, 2019
    Rent-seeking is economics jargon for chasing after unfair special favors from government. Businesses and individuals have a large menu of rent-seeking options to choose from, and antitrust regulations are one of the items. Licensing regulations and other restrictions can make it harder for startups to enter a market, favoring incumbent businesses.
  • Where Facebook Interim Report on Bias Falls Short

    August 20, 2019
    Today former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl (R-AZ), in fulfillment of an arrangement with Facebook, released an independent Interim Report (and accompanying op-ed) cataloging the primary concerns of conservatives who, as is now well known, regard Facebook as unfairly biased and opposed to conservative viewpoints.
  • Debt Collectors Keep Credit Market Flowing

    August 20, 2019
    Debt collecting is a profession that gets little love, but given the social good done by debt collectors who operate ethically and follow the rules, maybe it’s time that we show them some affection. If not that, we should at least give them reasonable rules to play by—rules that would also benefit consumers and entrepreneurs who participate in the credit market.
  • Cataloging Regulatory Costs of Cronyism and Rent-Seeking in a Self-Interested Administrative State

    August 19, 2019
    Rent-seeking as a policy concern has been done to death: It’s been described over and over how regulation is often not about elevating the public good, but instead about disadvantaging rivals and snagging their customers, or creating artificial scarcity—whatever transfers wealth.
  • PRO Act Undermines Employee Choice

    August 19, 2019
    Democrats in Congress introduced the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act with the state goal of strengthening union power and increasing union membership, which is near all-time lows. But to produce such a result, the rights of workers during union organizing campaigns are curtailed.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket