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  • West Antarctic Ice Sheet Growing As Southern Ocean Warms Slightly

    October 21, 2019
    The West Antarctic Ice Sheet is growing, but I bet you didn’t read about it in the news.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations   

    October 21, 2019
    Last week’s big stories included a thickening impeachment plot, Energy Secretary Rick Perry’s resignation, and a letter written to the president of Turkey. In a bit of amusing but unsurprising news, it emerged that White House trade advisor Peter Navarro repeatedly quoted a made-up China expert in several of his books. The fictional character’s name, Ron Nava, is an anagram for “Navarro.” Meanwhile, rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from REAL ID compliance to importing cotton.
  • VIDEO: How Does the Trade War Hurt You?

    October 18, 2019
    Our friends over at the Cato Institute are known for their excellent free-market analysis, in particular on hot button issues like trade. They recently released a great short video to drive home the actual incidence of bad policy: “How Does the Trade War Hurt You?”
  • Repeal of Trump Power Plant Rule Fails in Senate

    October 18, 2019
    The U.S. Senate today defeated by 53-41 a Democrat-sponsored Congressional Review Act resolution of disapproval that aims to overturn the Trump administration’s Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) rule, which simultaneously repealed and replaced the Obama administration’s so-called Clean Power Plan (CPP).
  • United States, Carbon Tax Laggard?

    October 17, 2019
    The United States “lags” other nations’ use of carbon taxes, ClimateWire (subscription required) reports. Specifically, the United States ranks 40th out of 44 countries in a new Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) report examining each country’s combined taxes on carbon-based energy sources. Such “taxes” include cap-and-trade programs, because those policies also put an explicit price on the carbon content of fuels or emissions.
  • Are Hurricanes Becoming Blow-Hards?

    October 16, 2019
    Last month, as Tropical Storm Imelda slowly dissipated over south Texas, creating yet another Texas-sized flood, I read an article in Business Insider making the remarkable claim that “warming overall makes hurricanes more frequent and devastating than they would otherwise be.”
  • In Praise of Pro-Consumer Tenure of Finance Regulator Kraninger

    October 16, 2019
    As she prepares to give her semi-annual testimony to Congress this week—on Wednesday to the House Financial Services Consumer Financial Protection Bureau and on Thursday to the Senate Banking Committee—Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Director Kathy Kraninger has much to be proud of. Since the Senate confirmed her in December 2018, Kraninger has worked diligently to make the CFPB more transparent, more accountable, and ultimately more consumer-friendly.
  • CEI Leads Coalition Letter Supporting Airport Financing Reform

    October 16, 2019
    Today CEI led a coalition letter in support of H.R. 3791, the “Investing in America: Rebuilding America’s Airport Infrastructure Act,” the bipartisan airport financing reform legislation introduced by Reps. Thomas Massie (R-KY) and Earl Blumenauer (D-OR).
  • Killing Us with Kindness: Democrats' War on Vaping Costs Lives

    October 15, 2019
    Liberals are supposed to the ones whose hearts “bleed” with concern for others’ welfare. That’s why modern liberals generally reject an abstinence-only approach to regulation. They recognize that policies aimed at reducing harm, like sex education, needle exchange programs, and addiction services, are beneficial to both individuals and society while prohibition merely creates injustice and suffering.
  • This Week in Ridiculous Regulations 

    October 15, 2019
    The latest Mad Libs-style political feud involves the NBA, the television cartoon South Park, and the Chinese government. President Trump also issued a pair of executive orders intended to rein in regulatory dark matter, and the 2019 Federal Register topped 55,000 pages. Rulemaking agencies published new regulations ranging from pedestrians and bicycle traffic to significant uses of fatty acids.

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