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Greenhouse Delays, World Food Summit and Swine Flu Stats

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Greenhouse Delays, World Food Summit and Swine Flu Stats

World leaders agree to delay a binding agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

On the eve of the United Nations World Food Summit, a new report lists 20 ways to help feed the world.

The Centers for Disease Control issue recommendations for avoiding exposure to swine flu.

Listen to LibertyWeek, the CEI podcast, here

1. ENVIRONMENT

World leaders agree to delay a binding agreement to limit greenhouse gas emissions.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Senior Fellow Christopher C. Horner on climate change and politics:

“The outcome of the [2010 midterm] elections will surely dictate the outcome of this scheme — which, as European diplomats have long admitted, is targeted at the U.S. Kyoto II would exempt the overwhelming majority of the world's nations, including those bit players like China, India, Mexico, Brazil, South Korea, Indonesia — where greenhouse gas emissions actually are growing, rapidly (which would be odd, if emissions really were the point; clearly, they are not).”

 

2. FOOD

On the eve of the United Nations World Food Summit, a new report lists 20 ways to help feed the world.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Senior Fellow Gregory Conko on how some of the UN’s own policies have contributed to the problem of world hunger:

“One example of the UN’s counterproductive involvement in the excessive regulation of biotechnology—also known as gene-splicing, or genetic modification (GM)—which has slowed agricultural and pharmaceutical research and development. Ultimately, GM products could alleviate famine and water shortages for millions, and even lead to the development of vaccines incorporated into edible fruits and vegetables.”

 

3. HEALTH

The Centers for Disease Control issue recommendations for avoiding exposure to swine flu.

CEI Expert Available to Comment: Adjunct Analyst Michael Fumento on the latest flu statistics:

“Last week there was a massive decline in samples submitted to the CDC surveillance labs and a small decline in those testing positive. This week the bottom fell out. Samples submitted have gone from about 26,000 to 21,000 to just 13,000. Almost 39% of those samples were positive two weeks ago; now it’s just 30%. Put another way, the CDC labs received 10,076 positive samples two weeks ago, 7,557 last week, and just 3,834 this week. That’s a plummet of positive sample of over 60% in just two weeks!”

 

Listen to LibertyWeek, the CEI podcast, here.