You are here

OpenMarket: Trade and International

  • Tariffs Slow Investment, Threaten Retail Industry

    May 22, 2019
    Large U.S. companies slowed their investment in the first quarter of 2019, largely because of ongoing trade tensions between the U.S. and China. This is exactly what free-trade economics suggested would happen. When costs increase because of tariffs and uncertainty shadows the direction of trade policy, companies delay investment.
  • Trump Mostly Removes Steel, Aluminum Tariffs against Mexico, Canada: Barriers Still Higher than in 2017

    May 17, 2019
    The Trump administration is mostly lifting its steel aluminum tariffs on Canada and Mexico, effective 48 hours from today’s announcement. But metal tariffs will remain higher than they were just 14 months ago. They have raised consumer prices for cars, housing, and washing machines, while preventing passage of President Trump's signature revised NAFTA/USMCA trade agreement. Even now, passage is not guaranteed. 
  • Boeing Pushes 100 Percent Tariffs on Airbus

    May 15, 2019
    Boeing, fresh off a victory in restoring the Export-Import Bank’s full lending authority, is floating the idea of a 100 percent tariff on Airbus aircraft and parts. Airbus is Boeing’s largest competitor. There are four factors in play here. The first three are public relations, the opportunity costs of cronyism, and how best to pursue a level playing field in the global economy. The fourth is the likely retaliation such a move would spark.
  • Trade War State of Play: China, USMCA

    May 14, 2019
    If President Trump’s trade war has a single takeaway, it is this: Raising tariffs is an ineffective bargaining strategy. When the U.S. raises its tariffs, other countries always retaliate, and always become less cooperative.
  • ‘Forefront of Opportunity and Abundance’—Sec. Pompeo’s Remarks to Arctic Council 

    May 10, 2019
    On May 7th in Finland, U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo participated in the eleventh Ministerial Meeting of the Arctic Council. The meeting “ended without a formal agreement after the United States refused to allow language on climate change to be included” (E&E News, May 7th, 2019). 
  • Trump Threatens New China Tariff with May 10th Deadline

    May 6, 2019
    On Sunday, President Trump announced via Twitter that if he does not approve of the results of this week’s U.S.-China trade talks, he will enact a new tariff on Friday, May 10th. It would raise a current 10 percent tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods to 25 percent. He threatened a similar tariff late last year, but backed off. China, in response, might withdraw from the talks altogether.
  • Ex-Im Bank Revival?

    May 3, 2019
    Next week the Senate is expected to vote on new board members for the Export-Import Bank, which gives favorable financing terms to foreign governments and businesses when they buy U.S. products. Ex-Im’s charter expires on September 30. If Congress does not reauthorize it, Ex-Im would close its doors to new projects, wind down its portfolio, and then disappear entirely.
  • House Has No Jurisdiction over Paris Agreement

    April 5, 2019
    If you have ever wondered whether Democratic leaders understand the U.S. Constitution when they bash President Trump for allegedly violating it, or just use “unconstitutional” as a mantra for opposing policies (or 2016 election winners) they don’t like, ponder no further. H.R. 9, the “Climate Action Now Act,” exposes House leaders as faux guardians of America’s basic charter of government.
  • VIDEO: Bitter Taste of Big Sugar's Corporate Welfare

    April 5, 2019
    John Stossel and the team at Reason TV have a new video out on the expensive and wasteful federal sugar program, which benefits a tiny handful of wealthy families while raising prices for everyone else. 
  • Response to Conservative Supporter of Kigali Amendment

    March 29, 2019
    The Kigali Amendment is a United Nations environmental measure proposed by the Obama administration, and that ought to be reason enough for conservatives to be skeptical of it. A close look at the Kigali Amendment’s provisions, which restrict refrigerants it deems contributors to climate change, confirms that it is a very bad deal for consumers and businesses that rely on air-conditioning and refrigeration.  

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: Trade and International