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OpenMarket: Risk and Consumer Freedom

  • Cocktails in Quarantine: How your State Governs Booze Buying during Lockdown

    May 15, 2020
    With all the other added stress created by the outbreak of COVID-19, most states have chosen to relax alcohol laws in a pragmatic bid to save struggling businesses and encourage compliance with social distancing. CEI has prepared this handy list of states that currently allow alcohol delivery or curbside pickup. Enjoy responsibly.
  • The Man Who Fed the World, And the Film that Condemned Him for It

    April 22, 2020
    The first indication that PBS’s new documentary on agronomist Norman Borlaug will not be overly laudatory is its title. Anti-hunger activist Leon Hesser called his biography of the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize winner The Man Who Fed the World. But film writer/director/producer Rob Rapley was only willing to call Borlaug The Man Who Tried to Feed the World. Still, while the program struggles to find fault with Borlaug and his methods, the positives cannot help but shine through.
  • Robots Are Here to Make Your Job Safer and Cleaner

    April 10, 2020
    Positive stories about win-win results from the march of automation are everywhere in our economy, but they don’t get told and repeated enough. The workers who are told they should be the most worried about their jobs being stolen by robots are, in fact, the ones who will likely benefit the most from future jobs that will be safer and more pleasant.
  • Deregulation Is an Effective Pandemic Defense

    April 9, 2020
    In a new op-ed in RealClearMarkets, Iain Murray and Ryan Young outline the major points of CEI’s just-released #NeverNeeded paper, which identifies regulations harmful to the coronavirus response.
  • EPA Inspector General Report Could Exacerbate Medical Supply Shortages

    April 3, 2020
    As hospitals struggle to access sterile medical supplies, the EPA Inspector General released a report that could make things worse. It alleges that EPA officials failed to warn people of cancer risks associated with ethylene oxide emissions from medical sterilization plants—a claim that holds no water. The IG’s allegations are based on flawed science and could undermine operations at these facilities.
  • FDA Four-Month Delay Not Enough to Save E-Cigarette Industry

    April 3, 2020
    To fight the coronavirus, many states have pressed pause on certain rules and regulations. Vermont Governor Phil Scott signed an order lifting the state ban on home alcohol delivery. This was a pragmatic move, yet that pragmatism hasn’t been extended to e-cigarettes, which are a viable option for smoking cessation.
  • Greenpeace’s Swing and Miss Reveals Its Hypocrisy about Health Risks from Reusable Bags 

    March 26, 2020
    According to Greenpeace, my recent article on the sanitary benefits of single-use plastic bags is part of an effort to “exploit” COVID-19 fears and promote “pro-pollution agendas.” But Greenpeace’s accusations are not just wrong, they are laughable. In fact, they better describe Greenpeace’s tactics.
  • House Democrats’ Third Coronavirus Supplemental Appropriation Bill Is an Outrage

    March 26, 2020
    The Take Responsibility for Workers and Families Act is the most irresponsible piece of fiscal legislation to come out of the profligate Congress for a long time, at $2.5 trillion. It is an insult to a nation in the throes of a scary pandemic, witnessing horrific deaths from oxygen starvation, with no obvious end in sight.
  • Regulation, Not Offshoring, Is Hindering Industry from Ramping up Production

    March 25, 2020
    In his latest Bloomberg column, Noah Smith argues that offshoring production led to the current shortage of medical masks and equipment in the face of the coronavirus. The real question is: Why can’t we suddenly switch production and churn out millions of masks a day in the face of an unanticipated calamity? The answer to that is not offshoring, but regulation.
  • Toilet Paper Economics: Emergency Capitalism Still Better Than Normal Socialism

    March 17, 2020

    There are quite a few hot takes circulating at the moment about how grocery stores temporarily running out of toilet paper amid the current coronavirus pandemic is a stinging indictment of a capitalist economy. Most of those takes are not serious enough to be worth refuting, but apparently it bears repeating that consumer choice in a free society during difficult times is still better than the options that are available under normal conditions in a socialist society.

    I blogged a while back about how most Americans who tell pollsters that they approve of “socialism” aren’t talking about the life they would experience under an actual socialist regime. When they say they like socialism they mean...

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