You are here

OpenMarket: Tech and Telecom

  • Attorneys General Shouldn't Hold Mergers Hostage

    December 3, 2019
    Last week the attorneys general of Texas and Nevada announced the withdrawal of their support of a multistate lawsuit to block the merger of cellular telephone and Internet service providers T-Mobile and Sprint. This follows similar announcements from the attorneys general of Mississippi and Colorado earlier this year. With these announcements, more state attorneys general now support the merger than oppose it.
  • Government of Singapore Demonstrates Real Online Censorship

    December 2, 2019
    Singapore’s recent policing of online content provides an instructive example of the difference between private curating of material by platform owners and dangerous curtailing of free speech by governments. 
  • Twitter's Ban on Political Ads Has No First Amendment Implications

    October 31, 2019
    Twitter Chief Executive Jack Dorsey announced that the social media platform will ban all political advertising. This comes on the heels of Facebook’s recent announcement that the company won’t fact check political ads on their platform. Whichever tack tech companies take with their privately owned platforms, there are no First Amendment implications. The First Amendment prevents only the government from making laws that abridge freedom of speech.
  • Cautiously Optimistic about Facebook's New Approach to Speech

    October 23, 2019
    It seems increasingly the case that there is a lot more to like about what Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg has to say than not. His recent speech at Georgetown University, outlining the company’s general direction when it comes to content moderation, is no exception.
  • Lead State in Big Tech Antitrust Suit Misleadingly Inflates Google’s Size

    September 11, 2019
    In The Wall Street Journal today, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, who is spearheading a multistate antitrust investigation into Google, made an egregious error.
  • Facebook's $5 Billion Privacy Fine Almost Certainly Too High

    September 3, 2019
    Facebook has faced intense criticism from lawmakers and regulators since last spring, when The Observer and The New York Times reported that data from over 50 million Facebook users had been harvested as part of Cambridge Analytica’s effort to influence American voters.
  • Will T-Mobile/Sprint Merger Increase Prices?

    August 21, 2019
    Lots of things influence prices and, of course, not all are influenced by the same factors. However, the lawsuit filed by several state attorneys general against T-Mobile/Sprint merger explicitly links the number of competitors in wireless market places to lower prices in several places.
  • Where Facebook Interim Report on Bias Falls Short

    August 20, 2019
    Today former U.S. Senator Jon Kyl (R-AZ), in fulfillment of an arrangement with Facebook, released an independent Interim Report (and accompanying op-ed) cataloging the primary concerns of conservatives who, as is now well known, regard Facebook as unfairly biased and opposed to conservative viewpoints.
  • States Making Predictable Grab for Revenue via Online Sales Taxes

    August 14, 2019
    Fallout from the 2018 South Dakota v.​​​​​​​ Wayfair Supreme Court decision, which allowed remote sales tax collection from online purchases, has begun and The Wall Street Journal editorialized on the sad state of affairs yesterday. The Competitive Enterprise Institute spent twenty years articulating the advantages of tax competition and warning of the repercussions of allowing states to reach outside their borders and collect taxes from businesses located entirely outside that state.
  • Leaked White House Executive Order on 'Censorship' Violates Two Basic Constitutional Tenets

    August 9, 2019
    Earlier this week it was reported that the Trump administration was drafting an executive order to combat perceived “censorship” of conservatives on online platforms such as Facebook and Google. Without details, the Competitive Enterprise Institute urged caution since the First Amendment does not empower government to police speech but rather restricts government from limiting or compelling speech.

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: Tech and Telecom