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OpenMarket: Media, Speech and Internet Freedom

  • Americans Optimistic about Role of Tech and Platforms

    April 12, 2019
    At a time when big tech companies are being attacked over bigness, privacy, elections, and the ordering of their news feeds, the Charles Koch Institute has some good news. While we all have plenty of complaints, Americans also have a lot of good things to say about the platforms, websites, and apps that they use every day.
  • Facebook's Call for Regulation Could Lead to Government Censorship

    April 3, 2019
    The Internet is unique in history not because it lacked “rules” about free expression, but that it expanded that broadcast freedom to all, not just the few. Facebook, Google, and other social media firms do not “censor”—only government can do that.
  • Move Slowly and Establish Rules: Facebook's Call for Regulation

    April 2, 2019
    Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s motto used to be “Move fast and break things.” Now that his company is under increased political scrutiny—and facing calls for breakup from both right and left—he has changed his tune to “move slowly and establish rules.”
  • Net Neutrality Regulation Still a Bad Idea

    February 7, 2019
    The debate at today’s House Committee on Energy and Commerce hearing was largely between making blocking, throttling, and fast lanes illegal and going further to also place the Internet under heavy-handed Title II authority.
  • Agenda for the 116th Congress: Tech and Telecom

    January 28, 2019
    As technology and telecommunications evolve, new challenges inevitably arise for policy makers. New mandates or prohibitions should be avoided in all but the most exceptional circumstances. Ill-conceived rules could stifle the high-tech economy, saddling innovative firms with arbitrary regulations or draconian liability regimes.
  • End of the Road for Net Neutrality Comeback Attempt

    January 4, 2019
    The end of the 115th Congress meant the end of using the Congressional Review Act to void the Federal Communication Commission’s repeal of Obama-era net neutrality regulation. Sadly, advocates of more government control over the Internet will almost surely try to pass new net neutrality legislation in the new Congress. And just as the old regulations were bad for innovation, news ones legislators may dream up in 2019 will likely be a detriment to consumers if enacted.
  • Don't Blame Google for a Feature Consumers Want

    December 6, 2018
    It’s very rare I disagree with the great freedom-loving journalist John Stossel, but his column at Townhall this week made me raise an eyebrow. In it, he criticizes Google and its platform YouTube for having “power they shouldn’t have.” He was concerned that YouTube would “not allow” his new video, “Socialism Leads to Violence” to be viewed by young people. After his complaint, Google apparently lifted the restriction.
  • What Do the Midterms Mean for Big Tech?

    November 8, 2018
    For the big technology firms, the midterm elections were never going to change much.  Whatever the result, they were going to face more scrutiny over the next year. The only difference is in what sort of scrutiny. If anything, the split in control of the chambers presents the worst of both worlds.
  • California's Attempt at Net Neutrality Clearly Unconstitutional

    October 15, 2018

    On September 30, California Governor Jerry Brown signed into law SB-822, a set of regulations on Internet service providers that’s slated to go into effect at the beginning of 2019. Often referred to as a “net neutrality” bill, SB-822 aims to impose on Internet providers several sweeping mandates derived from a regulation issued by the Federal Communications Commission in 2015.

  • Ditch Antitrust Regulation in Favor of Competing Bigness

    August 28, 2018

    The Federal Trade Commission (born in 1914, fathered by Woodrow Wilson) is hosting a series of hearings and discussions on “Competition and Consumer Protection in the 21st Century,” particularly as these are affected by emerging business models in the modern high-tech economy. We at the Competitive Enterprise Institute provided a brief filing and there will be more opportunities for the public to weigh in.

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