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OpenMarket: Lands and Wildlife

  • Department of Justice Wrong to Block Sabre Acquisition of Farelogix

    December 18, 2019
    On January 27th, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) will attempt to block travel technology company Sabre Corporation from purchasing communications protocol innovator Farelogix, Inc. This will be the DOJ’s first time back at bat after striking out in June 2018 against AT&T’s ultimately successful acquisition of Time Warner. Unfortunately, it’s a good example of overzealous antitrust regulation.
  • Lawmakers Fatal Conceit on Recycling Should Be Trashed

    December 5, 2019
    “The more things change, the more they stay the same” is a wise observation, and it’s particularly true in politics. I’ve been following solid waste management policy for about 30 years, and every so many years there is a new spin on the so-called “garbage crisis.” The circumstances may change but the problem remains the same: politicians think they can better manage waste than individuals in a free marketplace. Time and again, their fatal conceit is proved wrong.
  • Appalachian Trail Should Not Block New Energy Development

    February 15, 2019
    The Department of Justice is pushing back against a federal court decision that could jeopardize the future availability and affordability of natural gas across America’s east coast.
  • Supreme Court Ruling Puts Important Limits on Federal Authority under Endangered Species Act

    November 28, 2018
    On November 27, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously, in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, that there are limits to how far the federal government can go in using the Endangered Species Act to take people’s private property. The Court appears to have grasped the fact that the ESA is increasingly being used not to protect endangered species and their habitat, but as a cost-free form of federal land-use control and federal zoning.
  • CEI Challenges Federal Rejection of Alaska's Pebble Mine

    November 15, 2018
    Most job-creating projects don’t require government subsidies―the only thing private sector builders need is less federal red tape getting in their way.   A good case in point is the Pebble Mine in Alaska, currently being held up by the Environmental Protection Agency. That is why the Competitive Enterprise Institute is filing a Petition for Correction under the Information Quality Act to help clear away EPA’s unjustified rejection of this project.
  • Environmental Groups Petition EPA to Prevent Damage from Renewable Fuel Standard

    November 2, 2018

    EarthJustice, the National Wildlife Federation, and other environmental pressure groups have petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to better police the land use requirements in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

  • How to Articulate a Free-Market Vision for the Future

    October 16, 2018

    The Competitive Enterprise Institute views most market failure rationales for government intervention as wrong, overstated, or unproven (or all of the above). The Competitive Enterprise Institute views most market failure rationales for government intervention as wrong, overstated, or unproven (or all of the above). That belief is very difficult to test, however, because government has seized control of the relevant resources and blocks the market discovery process. 

  • Energy Dominance: Department of Interior Breaks Previous Records for Oil and Gas Lease Sales

    September 7, 2018

    “In a testament to the Trump Administration's America First Energy Plan, the Bureau of Land Management’s (BLM) third-quarter oil and gas lease sale in New Mexico broke all previous records by grossing nearly $1 billion in bonus bids for 142 parcels,” the Department of Interior announced in a press release on September 6th.

  • Reform Federal Process for Environmental Permits

    August 24, 2018

    The Trump administration has initiated several steps to streamline the federal permitting process for major projects, including resource extraction and infrastructure. In particular, it has focused on the need to fix the problems surrounding the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), which can add years of delays and tens of millions of dollars to the cost of job-creating projects and serves to kill some worthy projects outright. 

  • Reform Endangered Species Act to Contain Costs

    August 22, 2018

    The Endangered Species Act (ESA), passed in 1973, has had several decades to accumulate a record of costs and benefits. Despite bureaucrats and activists often pointing to it as a success story of environmental policymaking, its record is one of enormous costs and shockingly few benefits. The time is long since due for a formal reckoning of the ESA’s economic impact—and a plan for how Congress and the executive branch can reform it. You can find the beginning of such a plan in the new CEI study “‘Whatever the Cost’ of the Endangered Species Act, It’s Huge.  

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