You are here

OpenMarket: Lands and Wildlife

  • Thirteen Years and Counting: Idaho Case Illustrates How Regulatory Enforcement Can Go Awry

    September 8, 2020
    In 2007, Mike and Chantell Sackett broke ground on a lot near scenic Priest Lake, Idaho, where they planned to build their dream home. Thirteen years later, they’re still waiting on their dream home. Because, since 2007, the Sacketts have been the targets of arbitrary and abusive prosecution by the EPA, and their project remains in limbo.
  • A Discussion on Saving Bluebirds through Private Conservation, and a Tribute to Andy Thompson

    August 21, 2020
    The following interview of CEI Senior Fellow R.J. Smith was inspired with the encouragement of former CEI staff member Andy Thompson, who passed away recently. Like R.J., Andy was a nature lover and highly knowledgeable birdwatcher—a hobby that connected the two and promoted their shared appreciation for private conservation.
  • The Man Who Fed the World, And the Film that Condemned Him for It

    April 22, 2020
    The first indication that PBS’s new documentary on agronomist Norman Borlaug will not be overly laudatory is its title. Anti-hunger activist Leon Hesser called his biography of the 1970 Nobel Peace Prize winner The Man Who Fed the World. But film writer/director/producer Rob Rapley was only willing to call Borlaug The Man Who Tried to Feed the World. Still, while the program struggles to find fault with Borlaug and his methods, the positives cannot help but shine through.
  • Luddites, not Almond Milk, Pose Biggest Risk to Honeybees

    January 29, 2020
    A recent story in the Guardian alleges that almond growers are somehow uniquely responsible for substantial losses of honeybee hives, and that may eventually lead to their extinction. The article gets a large number of facts wrong, but the story really isn’t about almond farms or even honeybees. It’s about the author’s wrongheaded belief that high-yield farming is bad for the environment. Ironically, the author’s implied “solution” would actually wreak havoc on the environment.
  • Department of Justice Wrong to Block Sabre Acquisition of Farelogix

    December 18, 2019
    On January 27th, the United States Department of Justice (DOJ) will attempt to block travel technology company Sabre Corporation from purchasing communications protocol innovator Farelogix, Inc. This will be the DOJ’s first time back at bat after striking out in June 2018 against AT&T’s ultimately successful acquisition of Time Warner. Unfortunately, it’s a good example of overzealous antitrust regulation.
  • Lawmakers' Fatal Conceit on Recycling Should Be Trashed

    December 5, 2019
    “The more things change, the more they stay the same” is a wise observation, and it’s particularly true in politics. I’ve been following solid waste management policy for about 30 years, and every so many years there is a new spin on the so-called “garbage crisis.” The circumstances may change but the problem remains the same: politicians think they can better manage waste than individuals in a free marketplace. Time and again, their fatal conceit is proved wrong.
  • Appalachian Trail Should Not Block New Energy Development

    February 15, 2019
    The Department of Justice is pushing back against a federal court decision that could jeopardize the future availability and affordability of natural gas across America’s east coast.
  • Supreme Court Ruling Puts Important Limits on Federal Authority under Endangered Species Act

    November 28, 2018
    On November 27, the Supreme Court ruled unanimously, in Weyerhaeuser v. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, that there are limits to how far the federal government can go in using the Endangered Species Act to take people’s private property. The Court appears to have grasped the fact that the ESA is increasingly being used not to protect endangered species and their habitat, but as a cost-free form of federal land-use control and federal zoning.
  • CEI Challenges Federal Rejection of Alaska's Pebble Mine

    November 15, 2018
    Most job-creating projects don’t require government subsidies―the only thing private sector builders need is less federal red tape getting in their way.   A good case in point is the Pebble Mine in Alaska, currently being held up by the Environmental Protection Agency. That is why the Competitive Enterprise Institute is filing a Petition for Correction under the Information Quality Act to help clear away EPA’s unjustified rejection of this project.
  • Environmental Groups Petition EPA to Prevent Damage from Renewable Fuel Standard

    November 2, 2018

    EarthJustice, the National Wildlife Federation, and other environmental pressure groups have petitioned the Environmental Protection Agency to better police the land use requirements in the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS).

Pages

Subscribe to OpenMarket: Lands and Wildlife