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OpenMarket: Food and Beverage Regulation

  • 85 Years after Repeal, Prohibition Lingers in Your Beer

    December 10, 2018
    On December 5, 1933 the federal government’s nationwide prohibition against alcohol ended. Eighty-five years later, the beer market seems to have finally recovered. Today, there are more than 6,000 breweries—more than at any time before or since Prohibition—making a seemingly endless variety of beer for us enthusiasts to enjoy. But, while we may be living in the “golden age” of beer, the specter of Prohibition remains.
  • Can You Buy Alcohol on Christmas in Your State?

    December 3, 2018
    The holidays bring parties, feasts, and libations. But some celebrants may find themselves without a cup of cheer if they wait until the day of a holiday to buy their booze. Though alcohol Prohibition ended 85 years ago this December, many states maintain Prohibition-era laws, which ban the sales of liquor on Sundays and certain holidays.
  • Greens Want to Hide the Truth about Chlorpyrifos

    October 26, 2018

    Environmental crusades to ban pesticides often exaggerate chemical risks with little, if any, consideration of how bans undermine food production. And there is a reason for that: a balanced approach undermines the greens’ radical agenda. Just recently, some activists have gone as far as to ask a federal court to basically ignore an amicus brief filed by farm groups. It details the damage that a court-ordered pesticide ban could cause.

  • Unfounded Accusations Regarding Bees and Glyphosate

    October 3, 2018

    Recent accusations that a popular weed killer harms honeybees have become headline news in a wide range of sources including CBS News, The Guardian, and Popular Science. Yet the solitary study they all cite doesn’t hold much water.

  • No, One or Two Alcoholic Drinks a Day Is Not Unsafe or Unhealthy

    August 31, 2018

    Here we go again. A new round of news headlines implies any level of alcohol consumption is bad for you, based on the findings of a single study that contradicts decades of research. “No amount of alcohol is safe, health experts warn” as a CNBC headline put it, with others like CNN, CNBC, The ...

  • Science Reporters Get it Wrong: Moderate Alcohol Consumption Isn't Dangerous

    August 17, 2018

    Joel Achenbach, a science and politics reporter, once asked why “many reasonable people doubt science.” He should look at his own reporting on alcohol research for the possible explanation. Despite decades of overwhelming evidence that moderate drinking confers health benefits, Achenbach’s August 3 Washington Post piece asserts that the evidence is “murky.” The basis for the assertion seems to come from a single study published in April in the journal...

  • The Roundup on Monsanto's Roundup: Six Facts You Should Know

    August 17, 2018

    Yesterday, I addressed why last week’s court order calling for a ban on the pesticide chlorpyrifos was both dangerous and wrongheaded. Today, we look at the details of another case that was also decided last Friday related to glyphosate, an herbicide used in Monsanto’s brand known as Roundup. In both cases, environmental activists (and trial lawyers in this particular case) have leveraged junk science to wrongly demonize products that farmers need to produce food.

  • Six Things You Should Know about the Pesticide Chlorpyrifos

    August 16, 2018

    Last week was a bad one for farmers. Two legal decisions were released that promise to undermine access to valuable agrochemicals that farmers need to produce a safe and affordable food supply. Both of these decisions came about thanks to a series of lies, misinformation, and junk science peddled by environmental activists and trial lawyers.

  • Debunking the (Plastic) Straw Man Arguments

    August 3, 2018

    Of all the consumer products one might have expected to become a flashpoint for political controversy, the humble plastic drinking straw is an unlikely contender. Leap into the headlines it has, though, with communities like Seattle and San Francisco recently enacting bans on disposable straws. The city council of Santa Barbara, California initially voted for a ban that would have punished restaurant workers with up to six months of jail time for giving out a disposable plastic straw, but city officials agreed to revisit the ordinance when it appeared to also ban the sale of straws at supermarkets.

  • Will Coffee Give You Cancer (in California)?

    May 25, 2018

    Our friends over at Reason TV have a new video asking the attention-grabbing headline “Will coffee give you cancer?” As it turns out, no (unless you’re drinking several thousand cups of coffee a day). But the news earlier this year that the state of California was going to require every coffee shop in the state to post signs warning customers about a cancer risk is, itself, a serious issue.

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